1. #1

    Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    I've been getting very high DPC Latency and audio crackling for the past 3 days, since I've installed a new Motherboard, CPU, GPU, and RAM. When I installed the new hardware, I also reinstalled Windows 10 - wiping all the data from my boot drive (SSD), and also the data from my data drives (HDD). After getting everything up and running, I noticed light crackling in the audio, but thought the problem may be my headset for some reason, and tried my monitor's speakers, where the crackling continued. I installed all the latest drivers from the motherboards manufacturer on their website, but this did not help. I've been going from tech forum to youtube videos to anything else I could think of trying to fix this, because the audio crackling is most prevalent in 3D applications like video games, where the crackling is constant and often louder than the game sounds, rendering them unplayable.

    Here are all the parts I have in my PC.

    Here is a zip containing all of the LatencyMon pages relevant to the problem, sorted correctly. Note this those images were taken AFTER causing the problem to occur in a game, namely WarThunder, on steam.

    Please, any help in solving this issue is Greatly appreciated. It's starting to feel like a never ending headache. The people on Tom's Hardware directed me here because they couldn't figure it out either.


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  2. #2

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Hi BestLux ... and welcome to the forums ...


    Nice specs on your system. I'm guessing that your previous board wasn't a Z170. Unfortunately, the Z170 boards seem to be showing up a lot in threads concerning audio issues, especially when paired with Nvidia video cards and Realtek onboard sound. I have a list that I'll paste into this post that is a compilation of several tweaks that have helped some users get their audio better. Unfortunately, the tweaks don't help every system.

    Another wild card, now that we are in August 2016 -- is that the Windows 10 Anniversary update has been rolling out. It contains quite a few changes, and it can undo quite a lot of prior system optimization. Whether for better or worse, it's something to be aware of - tweaks carried out before the update might well have to be re-done again afterwards. It would be very nice (crazy magic, in fact) if the update would solve all of the video/audio artifact issues in Windows 10. But not many updates have that "fairy godmother" effect....

    On your graphs, the latencies and interrupts didn't look that bad, while the high hard pagefaults were off the chart (literally) on the one Latency monitor bar graph. Since yours is a new installation of Windows 10, some of that overly large background activity has been known to calm down after a few days. We can always hope.

    EventViewer Errors: can you have a look in Event Viewer - select the "Event Viewer (Local)" item in the upper right hand corner, and then view the items in the "Summary of Administrative Events" window. Check for any patterns for errors, especially Critical errors. I'm interested to hear if you see any evidence of "blue screen" errors.

    [If you'd like, you can zip the "Administrative Events" log - available from Custom Views - and post that here].

    In one of your charts, you have a few processes running that I don't usually see:
    crashdmp.sys .... Crash Dump Driver
    werkernel.sys .... Windows Error Reporting Kernel Driver
    iorate.sys .... I/O Rate Control Filter
    disk.sys .... PnP Disk Driver
    esrv_svc.exe .... Intel System Usage Report

    I looked on three Windows 10 tester machines here, and none of them showed any of those five processes running. They look to be the sort of thing that would run after system issues appear.
    _________________________

    Here's the list I promised:

    Some things to try for limiting audio/video glitches due to high latency issues and high hard pagefault issues

    SSDs
    Since SSDs are dropping in price and growing in size, I've lately been recommending that the worst-offending audio-pop suffering programs/games be installed onto the SSD. Windows doesn't take up all that much room, and neither do a few games (you can still keep "saved games" and other non-demanding software installed to a larger "spinning" hard drive, along with your photo, music, and video collections).

    SATA ports
    Some users who haven't seen any improvement by means of updating drivers have had success by altering their SATA port usage. A recent thread here concerns a system where the audio stuttering was helped by unplugging a DVD SATA drive (...and our tech Cluberti was nice enough to help explain why) ... The last few posts are where you will see mention of the SATA ports (and the nature of USB polling & the effect on latencies) .... Here's a link to that thread:
    High DPC Latency or pagefaults - Fresh Install - USBPORT.SYS and others.

    Hard Pagefaults
    For the high hard pagefaults, it can help to:
    1) Limit startup processes that you don't need
    2) Limit Windows-Updates file-sharing (in Settings > Updates and security > Windows Update > Advanced Options > Choose how updates are delivered > turn off "updates from more than one place" - that will limit unnecessary background network activity)
    3) Limit the amount of "telemetry" (data sent to Microsoft ... choose the "Basic" option in Settings > Privacy > Feedback & Diagnostics ... and you can try "Never" as your "Feedback Frequency" while testing your latency issues)
    4) Limit any Notifications that you don't need or want (Settings > System > Notifications & actions ...[especially turn off Windows "tips"]
    5) Turn off "Live" tiles on your Start Menu (to limit unnecessary background updating of any information you don't want or need)
    6) Uninstall any Windows "Universal" apps that you don't want or need (Settings > System > Apps & features -- click the app you wish to uninstall) ... and for those that you don't want, but can't uninstall (some of the built-in apps) - you can still keep them from starting unwanted services (in Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services) or startup modules (in Task Manager > Startup tab)

    Drivers
    Hunt Windows 10 compatible drivers (this can be an ongoing process). Try generics if the manufacturer supplied drivers cause issues. Try older drivers when the new cause issues. Try and try again. Drivers are sometimes the culprits for high latencies and interrupts.

    Nvidia drivers - seem to be having issues on Z170 boards, especially when paired with Realtek onboard audio. When updating to the latest Nvidia driver, try installing it using the "custom" option, and the "clean install" option. You might also see if your want or need all of the background Nvidia services that come with the latest drivers, many as part of the "Nvdia GeForce Experience" - which you can choose to install or not when you choose the "custom" install method. Here's a guide that has some details on the background services installed along with the Nvidia drivers, it might help you decide if you can do without some of them:
    Disable NVIDIA Streamer Service and other NVIDIA processes - gHacks Tech News

    ASMedia USB 3.1 drivers .... have proved to be an issue for some users, especially for ASRock/ASUS Z170 motherboard owners. Hunt newer versions, try old versions, try generics. Still dicey as of July 2016....

    USB device drivers ... USB host controllers, USB gaming periferals (mice, keyboards, headsets...), musical instrument interfaces, wireless dongles - all these can prove to be sources of audio issues.

    Antivirus
    Some users find that certain modules of their antivirus program can have a rough affect on their audio quality. For some, it is especially noticeable when using the third-party firewall. You can try reverting to using just the Windows firewall, or to turn off a feature in the third-party firewall that blocks port scans (since most routers/modems/gateways have built-in port scanning blocking, it doesn't necessarily lower your defenses, since your hardware provides the service). This issue has shown up for users of BitDefender, Norton, and Avast ... it likely can occur for others as well. The issue also doesn't seem to be "universal" - it only seems to affect a certain blend of hardware/software. (I know users of Avast, BitDefender, & Norton who don't experience any issues at all).

    Virtual Memory & a large set range
    Since some computers experience the audio/video glitching during gaming, and Latency Monitor graphs often point to high hard pagefaults as a contributing factor (as in the pagefault tips above), I like to recommend testing things with the Virtual Memory settings for your computer manually set to a generous range (generally, with the lowest value the amount of your total installed physical system memory, and the highest value twice that number). This is an overly large range = but it can prove useful for testing. [after testing, the upper range could be lowered to one and a half times the physical memory total]... The reason for the large set range is that some games are infamous for memory leaks, and the large range might give you a better chance of surviving the memory trouble caused by the game with the memory leak.
    _________________________

    If your system hasn't received the Anniversary Update yet, might as well install it -- since it certainly might help/hurt the current situation. It makes a lot of changes.

    We'll see how things go

  3. #3

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Here is the administrative event log.

    I have the windows 10 anniversary update installed, it actually gave me that when I installed the fresh windows a few days ago. My OS is on the SSD, as are some games and other smaller programs, but I keep larger files on the WD Black 1TB drive. I moved the 3 drives around on the SATA ports (I have 4 sata ports and a sata express port, so I'm limited in places to plug them into.). I believe I have all the latest drivers installed, including an NVidia driver that they claimed fixes the DPC Latency issue with new Pascal GPU's (368.95), and I went through with the clean install only grabbing the display driver and PhysX. I had Avast! and tried uninstalling that, as well as Malwarebytes. I'll try the virtual memory right now.

    I'll also attach new results from LatencyMon.

    Thank you for the quick response.

  4. #4

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Quote Originally Posted by OldGrayGary View Post
    Hi BestLux ... and welcome to the forums ...


    Nice specs on your system. I'm guessing that your previous board wasn't a Z170. Unfortunately, the Z170 boards seem to be showing up a lot in threads concerning audio issues, especially when paired with Nvidia video cards and Realtek onboard sound. I have a list that I'll paste into this post that is a compilation of several tweaks that have helped some users get their audio better. Unfortunately, the tweaks don't help every system.

    Another wild card, now that we are in August 2016 -- is that the Windows 10 Anniversary update has been rolling out. It contains quite a few changes, and it can undo quite a lot of prior system optimization. Whether for better or worse, it's something to be aware of - tweaks carried out before the update might well have to be re-done again afterwards. It would be very nice (crazy magic, in fact) if the update would solve all of the video/audio artifact issues in Windows 10. But not many updates have that "fairy godmother" effect....

    On your graphs, the latencies and interrupts didn't look that bad, while the high hard pagefaults were off the chart (literally) on the one Latency monitor bar graph. Since yours is a new installation of Windows 10, some of that overly large background activity has been known to calm down after a few days. We can always hope.

    EventViewer Errors: can you have a look in Event Viewer - select the "Event Viewer (Local)" item in the upper right hand corner, and then view the items in the "Summary of Administrative Events" window. Check for any patterns for errors, especially Critical errors. I'm interested to hear if you see any evidence of "blue screen" errors.

    [If you'd like, you can zip the "Administrative Events" log - available from Custom Views - and post that here].

    In one of your charts, you have a few processes running that I don't usually see:
    crashdmp.sys .... Crash Dump Driver
    werkernel.sys .... Windows Error Reporting Kernel Driver
    iorate.sys .... I/O Rate Control Filter
    disk.sys .... PnP Disk Driver
    esrv_svc.exe .... Intel System Usage Report

    I looked on three Windows 10 tester machines here, and none of them showed any of those five processes running. They look to be the sort of thing that would run after system issues appear.
    _________________________

    Here's the list I promised:

    Some things to try for limiting audio/video glitches due to high latency issues and high hard pagefault issues

    SSDs
    Since SSDs are dropping in price and growing in size, I've lately been recommending that the worst-offending audio-pop suffering programs/games be installed onto the SSD. Windows doesn't take up all that much room, and neither do a few games (you can still keep "saved games" and other non-demanding software installed to a larger "spinning" hard drive, along with your photo, music, and video collections).

    SATA ports
    Some users who haven't seen any improvement by means of updating drivers have had success by altering their SATA port usage. A recent thread here concerns a system where the audio stuttering was helped by unplugging a DVD SATA drive (...and our tech Cluberti was nice enough to help explain why) ... The last few posts are where you will see mention of the SATA ports (and the nature of USB polling & the effect on latencies) .... Here's a link to that thread:
    High DPC Latency or pagefaults - Fresh Install - USBPORT.SYS and others.

    Hard Pagefaults
    For the high hard pagefaults, it can help to:
    1) Limit startup processes that you don't need
    2) Limit Windows-Updates file-sharing (in Settings > Updates and security > Windows Update > Advanced Options > Choose how updates are delivered > turn off "updates from more than one place" - that will limit unnecessary background network activity)
    3) Limit the amount of "telemetry" (data sent to Microsoft ... choose the "Basic" option in Settings > Privacy > Feedback & Diagnostics ... and you can try "Never" as your "Feedback Frequency" while testing your latency issues)
    4) Limit any Notifications that you don't need or want (Settings > System > Notifications & actions ...[especially turn off Windows "tips"]
    5) Turn off "Live" tiles on your Start Menu (to limit unnecessary background updating of any information you don't want or need)
    6) Uninstall any Windows "Universal" apps that you don't want or need (Settings > System > Apps & features -- click the app you wish to uninstall) ... and for those that you don't want, but can't uninstall (some of the built-in apps) - you can still keep them from starting unwanted services (in Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services) or startup modules (in Task Manager > Startup tab)

    Drivers
    Hunt Windows 10 compatible drivers (this can be an ongoing process). Try generics if the manufacturer supplied drivers cause issues. Try older drivers when the new cause issues. Try and try again. Drivers are sometimes the culprits for high latencies and interrupts.

    Nvidia drivers - seem to be having issues on Z170 boards, especially when paired with Realtek onboard audio. When updating to the latest Nvidia driver, try installing it using the "custom" option, and the "clean install" option. You might also see if your want or need all of the background Nvidia services that come with the latest drivers, many as part of the "Nvdia GeForce Experience" - which you can choose to install or not when you choose the "custom" install method. Here's a guide that has some details on the background services installed along with the Nvidia drivers, it might help you decide if you can do without some of them:
    Disable NVIDIA Streamer Service and other NVIDIA processes - gHacks Tech News

    ASMedia USB 3.1 drivers .... have proved to be an issue for some users, especially for ASRock/ASUS Z170 motherboard owners. Hunt newer versions, try old versions, try generics. Still dicey as of July 2016....

    USB device drivers ... USB host controllers, USB gaming periferals (mice, keyboards, headsets...), musical instrument interfaces, wireless dongles - all these can prove to be sources of audio issues.

    Antivirus
    Some users find that certain modules of their antivirus program can have a rough affect on their audio quality. For some, it is especially noticeable when using the third-party firewall. You can try reverting to using just the Windows firewall, or to turn off a feature in the third-party firewall that blocks port scans (since most routers/modems/gateways have built-in port scanning blocking, it doesn't necessarily lower your defenses, since your hardware provides the service). This issue has shown up for users of BitDefender, Norton, and Avast ... it likely can occur for others as well. The issue also doesn't seem to be "universal" - it only seems to affect a certain blend of hardware/software. (I know users of Avast, BitDefender, & Norton who don't experience any issues at all).

    Virtual Memory & a large set range
    Since some computers experience the audio/video glitching during gaming, and Latency Monitor graphs often point to high hard pagefaults as a contributing factor (as in the pagefault tips above), I like to recommend testing things with the Virtual Memory settings for your computer manually set to a generous range (generally, with the lowest value the amount of your total installed physical system memory, and the highest value twice that number). This is an overly large range = but it can prove useful for testing. [after testing, the upper range could be lowered to one and a half times the physical memory total]... The reason for the large set range is that some games are infamous for memory leaks, and the large range might give you a better chance of surviving the memory trouble caused by the game with the memory leak.
    _________________________

    If your system hasn't received the Anniversary Update yet, might as well install it -- since it certainly might help/hurt the current situation. It makes a lot of changes.

    We'll see how things go
    So I tried the virtual memory to no avail, and just tried reinstalling windows again to no avail. I'm about to try windows 7 but I get the feeling that it won't solve my issues.

  5. #5

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Hi again


    Thanks for the latest files. Can you re-send the EventViewer "Administrative Events" log, this time as an ".evtx" file? (I forgot to include that detail in my first post).... right-click the "Administrative Events" log in Custom Views, and select "Save Custom View as.... " and choose the ".evtx" option. The .evtx file format opens by default in EventViewer (which has a fairly nice layout for presenting the data).

    Sorry that you haven't seen any progress at all.... in fact, the latest graphs and chart show things a bit worse rather than better. Microsoft's Edge browser had some noticeably high hard pagefault counts this time around. Pretty awful hard pagefault counts. And the DPC/ISR numbers didn't improve (they got a little bit worse).

    You mention trying Windows 7 ... it might not hurt to try, but some of the issues have been known to persevere across all three or four of the latest versions of Windows (7/8/8l1/10). Since you've already activated Windows 10 on your hardware, you should retain your "digital entitlement" to Windows 10 indefinitely (meaning that you could try Windows 10 again on that hardware at some point in the future, at no further expense). I would expect Windows 10's issues with latencies/interrupts/pagefaults to eventually dwindle as the causes become clearer over time. Microsoft rarely hits a home run on its first at bat. And Windows 10 on gaming machines still feels like it's only seen one or two pitches. [Windows 10 on basic consumer and business machines is generally respectable already ... though with enough embarrassing flubs to keep it from being a "smash" success.]

    Another poster on this forum had his audio performance worsen moving from an older GTX to a newer one quite like yours (a 1070 or 1080). Makes my head spin that it is only on the high-end systems with wonderfully powerful video cards, abundant system memory, solid state hard drives, and up-to-the-minute operating systems are having these audio issues --- sometimes even when doing simple things like watching YouTube videos! Just about as frustrating as it gets.

    Well, it's late here in Southern California, so I'll check back again later on... Send along an .etvx Administrative Events log - perhaps we'll get lucky and find a clue in there....

    Good night!

  6. #6

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Quote Originally Posted by OldGrayGary View Post
    !
    Okay. I have all the latest information, this time on the freshest install of windows I think is possible. I've installed everything on my SSD, and to that end I've only really installed the latest drivers, steam, starbound, latencymon, and Razer Synapse. The problem persists.

    I saw on the reviews for this motherboard that at least a few people have experienced this same exact problem with this model, and found the fix to be swapping motherboards. I went ahead and got a motherboard on amazon, an MSI Z170A Gaming M5 . It should be arriving sometime this evening. I'll try reinstalling everything on that board and see if there's any improvement. If there is, then I guess we found the problem. If not, it doesn't hurt to try, since I can still return both boards to amazon till about the 20th.

    It is quite maddening that this problem is occurring on high-end computers. It's really put a wrench in my last few days, since I can't deal with the audio being so abysmal when I'm in a game or watching videos. Left to play mute. Good thing is that my video card, the GTX 1070, is performing to my expectations, getting well over my monitors refresh rate on nearly every game. Sometimes double.

  7. #7

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Hi again


    High Refresh rates
    You might want to dial back the refresh rate: I've heard that if it gets too far above the video & screen capabilities, it can affect the audio stream as well. I believe there is a "Sync" function on most of the recent Nvidia cards that can help with that.

    EventViewer Logs
    As my now-grown kids would say: "Dude, that's a lot of errors". Impressive amount of errors - especially for a time period of about 16 hours. Not sure what went wrong during the last clean install - but you have errors that I haven't even seen before. You have a little bit of everything going haywire: the Print Spooler running out of memory, trouble with the encryption components (including "Access Denied"), trouble with the Razer drivers (could be either the mouse, keyboard, or both), three different kinds of Microsoft Edge errors (plenty of those), DCOM server errors (welcome to the club, but you are now President of DCOM errors - far too many)... the DCOM errors were both timeouts and permissions trouble... You also had errors trying to load a driver for a Centon USB device (likely a flash memory stick) ... You even had 54 license errors in a row at one point -- but these license errors are likely nonsensical issues with the Windows Store and Universal apps [by the way, I didn't mention all the Universal App errors - but these seem to be "standard issue" since Windows 8] ... you probably won't see the license errors again - so the license errors are likely unimportant. One of the stranger errors in your logs was an error that informs us that you requested a system restart or shutdown, and the system was unable to comply.

    Some of these might be attributed to the newness of the Anniversary update. It certainly had a lot of issues found by the Insider testers ... it's likely that a fair number of issues might have slipped by (and your system found them)....

    Since a few of your errors are linked to a CCleaner setting: if you have CCleaner, make sure to remove the checkmark from the option box "MS Search" (in the Cleaning section). The newer versions of CCleaner like to leave a CCleaner monitoring component running from startup. I'm not interested in that - so I always disable CCleaner running forever on my machine. I like to choose how and when I use the broom, and on what. All this can be controlled in CCleaner's Settings screens.

    The Razer drivers might have to be reinstalled.

    It seems that some Apps from the Windows Store complain if they aren't installed onto the C: drive. [Makes me wonder what year it is.... 1995?...]

    Latest Charts & Graphs
    The DPC/ISR latencies/interrupts again point to trouble with the "HDAudBus.sys" driver ("High Definition Audio Bus driver - Microsoft Corporation") .... this is consistent with all of the earlier charts and graphs. The "Wdf01000.sys" high DPC counts are usually a symptom of the same thing .... HDAudBus.sys works with Wd01000.sys ....

    The new player in today's charts is the MMC item ("Microsoft Management Console") ... I imagine you had an Administrative Tools module working on something.

    Since the charts tend to skew the latencies a bit higher when running Resplendence's Latency Monitor ... (Latency Monitor is usually the highest source of latencies on any chart) ... can I guess that the audio issues are less when both it and any Administrative Tools aren't active? But that the issues still persist, regardless?

    New Motherboard
    Well, I hope the MSI board helps things. If nothing else, it uses a different Realtek chip that the Asus. The Asus uses the ALC892 while the MSI uses the AlC1150. Since both Asus and MSI stand behind their warranties, you are covered in that regard.

    And ... since you'll be doing a new install when the new board arrives, you needn't over-worry all the errors from the last install. We'll hope for the Jekyll and not the Hyde.

    Never a dull moment.

  8. #8

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    It looks like the motherboard was the most common denominator in this case. After installing the motherboard, and getting windows into yet another (5 now!) clean install, I used MSI's driver updater utility and everything works perfectly. Crystal clear stutter, static, and crackle free audio. I can't believe it's fixed, to be honest. I won't be buying ASUS products for the foreseeable future, at least not when it comes to motherboards.

  9. #9

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Wow. Very good news .... turns out a little Bibbidy-Bobbidy-Boo godmother magic seems to have transformed the pumpkin into a first class wagon on it's way to the ball. Kudos to MSI for getting the Z170 right.

    I have to wonder if the Asus situation is a matter of quality control, since not all of their boards (even of the same model) have issues. Hard to say: they always push the limits on new features - so "when they're good, they're very, very good, and when they're bad, they're horrid".... Hyde-ish!

    I'll bet your glad your system is working great, and you don't have to suffer through any more crazy posts from OldGray!

    Cheers & Congratulations.

  10. #10

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Quote Originally Posted by BestLux View Post
    It looks like the motherboard was the most common denominator in this case. After installing the motherboard, and getting windows into yet another (5 now!) clean install, I used MSI's driver updater utility and everything works perfectly. Crystal clear stutter, static, and crackle free audio. I can't believe it's fixed, to be honest. I won't be buying ASUS products for the foreseeable future, at least not when it comes to motherboards.
    Awesome thread ! I'm having the same problem on my Asus G752VW with an i76700HQ and Windows 10. I've tried every known "Audio tweak" from the net and cannot seem to get system latency down to any workable level.

    The problems are many fold. I can no longer "play" my keyboard in "real time" because I have to increase the audio buffers up, up, up from 512 to 1024 to 2048 very early in the composition process. This forces me to "program" parts instead of playing them. This is so tedious and a complete sapping of creative flow.

    The other frustrating aspect is the constant drain on CPU resources. This 6th generation i76700HQ with 2 SSD's, one for the OS one for Samples performs slightly worse than my i7920 desktop from 6 or so years ago....oh and btw....the System Latency on that old i7920 machine ? 7ms !!!!

    I'm glad that BestLux solved the issue, but, man, what a drastic measure to have to go through. A completely new MOBO $$$, another Windows 10 install (I don't even have the original install disc as my Asus didn't come with one), having to install ALL of the programs and VST instruments and plugins again !!! OH GAWD ! That's a couple of days of work right there....and VST Instrument companies are starting to limit the number of times you can install their plugins without explanations (more time)...arghhhhhh.......Is there no other solution ?

  11. #11

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Hi eightyeightkeys

    Tell you what, go ahead and see if any of the items in the lists in this post apply to your system: you might get enough relief with the tweaks - or not. If nothing else, Asus does have a recent BIOS/UEFI update for your laptop from July 15 (2016). It's version 214. ROG GL752VW | ROG - Republic Of Gamers | ASUS USA

    If the tweaks in the lists here, and the BIOS/UEFI update don't help, you can open a new thread - and we'll take a look. It's been pretty rough going, though ... we don't have many miracle cures. If you haven't installed the Anniversary Update yet, might as well give it a go -- it is a very large update, and has a chance to make a difference (for better or for worse!) ...

  12. #12

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    I've tried all the tweaks here as well as the latest BIOS 214 from Asus.

    There are several sites available with additional tweaks for professional audio :
    Windows Tuning Tips for Audio Processing – Native Instruments
    Optimising your PC for Audio on Windows 10 – Focusrite Audio Engineering
    Black Viper’s Windows 10 Service Configurations – Black Viper | www.blackviper.com

    Some Symptoms :
    #1) When I'm composing in Cubase 8.5 Pro, the built in ASIO/CPU meter, currently @ 50% or so, will suddenly spike out of nowhere with a pop-up window "CPU Overload"
    #2) The Resplendence Latency Monitor application starts off with everything in the "green" (go-to-go for pro audio) and then after several minutes will go into the red..."your computer is having trouble....bla, bla,.....)....VERY high hard page fault count....VERY high !...it will eventually spike out of range of the Latency Monitor graph.

    Any help is appreciated.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling-latency-monitor-start-trace-png   Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling-latency-monitor-2-5-minutes-later-png   Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling-latency-monitor-processes-page-png   Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling-latency-monitor-drivers-page-png  

  13. #13
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    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    • Please provide answers for (answer the best that you can):
      1. System Manufacturer?
      2. Laptop or Desktop?
      3. Exact model number (if laptop, check label on bottom)
      4. OS ? (Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7, Vista)
      5. x86 (32bit) or x64 (64bit)?
      6. Service pack?
      7. What was original installed OS on system?
      8. Is the OS an OEM version (came pre-installed on system) or full retail version (YOU purchased it from retailer)?
      9. Age of system? (hardware)
      10. Age of OS installation?
      11. Have you re-installed the OS?
      12. CPU
      13. RAM
      14. Video Card
      15. MotherBoard - (if NOT a laptop)
      16. Power Supply - brand & wattage (if laptop, skip this one)
      17. What security software are you using? (Firewall, antivirus, antimalware, antispyware, and so forth)
      18. Are you using proxy, vpn, ipfilters or similar software?
      19. Are you using Disk Image tools? (like daemon tools, alcohol 52% or 120%, virtual CloneDrive, roxio software)
      20. Are you currently under/overclocking? Are there overclocking software installed on your system?


    • System information log
      You should run only one of the following commands, the one you prefer.
      Read More:
      Code:
      msinfo32 /nfo "c:\users\YourWinAccountFolder\desktop\MsInfo.nfo"
      or
      msinfo32 /nfo "c:\users\%username%\desktop\MsInfo.nfo"
      or
      msinfo32 /nfo "%userprofile%\desktop\MsInfo.nfo"
      (Then upload it here)


    • Retrieve System Information, using speccy
      1. Download Speccy portable - actual version 1.29.714 (click), unzip/decompress it and put it on your desktop.
      2. When the program opens, it will retrieve some information regarding your system.
      3. Once it's done, select the File menu and choose Publish snapshot. Answer Yes to the confirmation message.
      4. On the next screen that comes up, choose the Copy to Clipboard button and paste this link in your next reply.
      5. (Or attach the log here, if you prefer to not publish it for some reason)



    • Download and install the Windows Performance Toolkit on dev.windows.com - Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) for Windows 10 - sdksetup.exe 1.12MB (click):
      Read More:
      Then open an elevated command prompt (right-click on the windows start button on bottom-left corner, left-click Command Prompt (Admin)) and launch these commands:
      Read More:
      You can also read the original tutorial/guide and its following posts for more informations:How to Diagnose and Fix High DPC Latency Issues with WPA (Windows Vista/7/8) (click) (by Niemiro)

  14. #14

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Asus ROG G752VW-DH71
    i76700HQ 2.6Ghz
    16GB RAM
    NVidia GTX960M & Intel Graphics HD530
    Windows 10 Home-Originally Installed-OEM-No Anniversary Update Yet
    Purchased March this year brand new
    Did a Windows "RESET" installing Windows 10 fresh - Factory install came with tons of bloatware
    BIOS-G752.214 American Megatrends
    No Overclock - BIOS is locked -very few user definable features
    Windows Defender, Malwarebytes
    No proxy, vpn, etc...
    No Disk Image Tools
    No overclocking software.

    The cmd prompt lines did not work.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  15. #15
    xilolee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    World, Europe, Italy
    Posts
    2,181
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        XILOLEE.com
      • Model Number:
        XILO
      • Motherboard:
        ASROCK FM2A88M Pro3+ chipset A88X Bolton-D4
      • CPU:
        A10-7800, 4 CPU, 4 thr, 65/45W, FM2+, 28nm, Steamroller/Kaveri
      • Memory:
        10GB (Nanya and kingston ddr3-1333 9-9-9-24)
      • Graphics:
        Radeon R7 720MHz (8 GPU cores, integrated in CPU)
      • Sound Card:
        RealTek ALC662 (integrated in MB)
      • Hard Drives:
        Seagate ST500DM002-1BD142 500GB 7200RPM
      • Power Supply:
        SuperFlower 450W 80+ Platinum (SF-450P14PE)
      • Case:
        Sharkoon VG4-S
      • Cooling:
        Realtek RTL8111GR (NIC integrated in MB)
      • Display:
        Samsung SyncMaster SA100 LS22A100NS-EN
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Home/Standard x64

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    What commands didn't work?

  16. #16

    Re: Very High DPC Latency - Audio Crackling

    Hi all

    [Still recommending that this be moved to a new thread... BestLux will otherwise be bombarded with unwanted email]

    I'd try installing the Anniversary Update ... another fairly large Cumulative Update for the Anniversary Update just came out yesterday (Tuesday Aug 30), and is arriving on many computers today....

    Since the updates make so many changes, install them & see how it goes. Note that some settings get set back to defaults, so some of your customizations might have to be redone.

    It's worthwhile to test both with & without Latency Monitor running, since Latency Monitor is itself usually the highest source of DPC latency when it's running.

    Hopefully, some of the background activity (leading to high hard pagefaults) is due to Windows Update, which should subside once the updates are installed.

    See how it goes


    [ & hi xilolee ]

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