1. #1
    Digerati's Avatar
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        BrightWorks Systems
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        BWS-6 E-IV
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i5-6600 Skylake Pushed to 3.9GHz
      • Memory:
        2 X 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000
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        EVGA GeForce GTX 1050TI 04G-P4-6251-KR, 4GB GDDR5
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      • Disk Drives:
        Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Blu-ray R/W
      • Power Supply:
        EVGA Supernova 550W Gold
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define R4 Mid Tower w/Window
      • Cooling:
        2 x 140mm case fans, OEM CPU Cooler
      • Display:
        2 x Samsung S24E650BW 24 inch WS
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit

    W10 Tech Preview Keylogger Explained

    I thought Lee Mathews' article, Microsoft clears the air on Windows 10 “keylogger”, and The Register article he references do a great job getting ahead of potential rumors of Microsoft spying on W10 users.

    Bottom line: Read your EULAs.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    MS MVP Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

    Heat is the bane of all electronics!


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  2. #2
    Corrine's Avatar
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    Re: W10 Tech Preview Keylogger Explained

    There has been quite the uproar in the press about this by headline grabbers, which has resulted in anti-Microsoft people running with the headlines. I've run into it at a couple of forums with people going so far as to say they will never install Windows 10, completely missing the point that the current availability is a Technical Preview and not a released, polished operating system which isn't expected until some time mid-2015. As Aryeh Goretsky (ESET Distinguished Researcher and Microsoft MVP) explained in another forum:

    Hello,

    During a crash, it's possible that all sorts of information might accidentally be gathered:

    - environment variables (including the username)
    - list of running processes, paths (which might include the username, language preferences, IP addresses, time zone, etc.)
    - IP addresses or hostnames of network connections
    - contents of windows (text, pictures, etc.)

    Microsoft has an amazingly thorough privacy policy and strict procedures in place to automatically scrub PII out of data and anonymize it, and that data gets further scrubbed before giving it to a third party, who has to sign all confidentiality agreements. That typically only comes into play though when doing things like debugging driver issues, and Microsoft needs to give someone like AMD or nVidia some crash data related to their graphics drivers.

    In previous pre-release versions of Windows OSes, I think the CEIP participation could be disabled, which is just not the case with Windows 10 Technical Preview. I suspect it may return as an option that can be disabled as it gets further into the release process (beta builds, consumer technology previews, whatever) but that's just a guess on my part.

    Keep in mind, that the Windows 10 Technical Preview is explicitly released so that Microsoft can get feedback on how the OS is being used, and to allow software and hardware manufacturers to test their products. It's not a shipping version of an operating system that you can buy on a PC at the store. It's unpolished code that's been released to solicit bug reports.

    If you're not in the mindset of wanting to use Windows 10 Technical Preview to help Microsoft find bugs, or to verify compatibility for products that you're developing, I'd suggest giving it a pass until a future build is available that better meets your needs, whatever those might be.

    Regards,

    Aryeh Goretsky
    Ed Bott put a different spin on the original Inquirer article:
    It started with a Friday-afternoon article in The Inquirer, a tech tabloid known for its breathless headlines and factually challenged prose. In true Inky fashion, the headline declared that Windows 10 "has permission to watch your every move," adding, ominously: "Its 'privacy' policy includes permission to use a keylogger."
    From a legalistic point of view, this headline is cleverly constructed. It doesn’t actually say that Windows 10 contains surveillance software that monitors your keystrokes and sends a log of those keystrokes to Redmond. In fact, the implication that there is an actual keylogger embedded in the Windows 10 code is contradicted by this key graf, buried near the end of the story:

    In other words, in effect, you are giving permission for Microsoft to screen your files, and in effect keylog your keyboard input. [emphasis added]
    “In effect.” Not in actuality. And in fact there’s little evidence that the author has enough background in computer science or security to tell a keylogger from a key lime pie.
    More in Ed Bott's article: Windows 10: You've got questions, I've got answers


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  3. #3
    Digerati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Nebraska, USA
    Posts
    3,357
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        BrightWorks Systems
      • Model Number:
        BWS-6 E-IV
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i5-6600 Skylake Pushed to 3.9GHz
      • Memory:
        2 X 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000
      • Graphics:
        EVGA GeForce GTX 1050TI 04G-P4-6251-KR, 4GB GDDR5
      • Sound Card:
        Integrated
      • Disk Drives:
        Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Blu-ray R/W
      • Power Supply:
        EVGA Supernova 550W Gold
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define R4 Mid Tower w/Window
      • Cooling:
        2 x 140mm case fans, OEM CPU Cooler
      • Display:
        2 x Samsung S24E650BW 24 inch WS
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit

    Re: W10 Tech Preview Keylogger Explained

    I am glad to see so many in IT media defending MS this time, instead of immediately bashing (as some obviously still do) or use tabloid headlines splashing with untruisms to gen up riotous reactions (followers). In the past, it seems they either bashed, or kept quiet as others bashed for something MS did, or didn't do, or more likely both.

    Not that MS hasn't had its share of bash-worthy moments! This just isn't one of them.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    MS MVP Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

    Heat is the bane of all electronics!

  4. #4

    Re: W10 Tech Preview Keylogger Explained

    I've run into it at a couple of forums with people going so far as to say they will never install Windows 10
    I guarantee most if not all of them will have Windows 10 come release, or soon after.

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