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  1. #21
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    Re: Building a new PC



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  2. #22
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Flashed the latest BIOS on the MOBO?

  3. #23
    writhziden's Avatar
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Yep.

  4. #24
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Have you tried setting a custom fan curve yourself and seeing if that remedies the issue?

  5. #25
    writhziden's Avatar
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Yep, that was my latest attempt to fix the issue. It helped a little at idle, but the fan kicks into high gear pretty often due to the temperature spikes. I'll probably just have to deal with it until either:

    1. The fan dies on its own due to excessive use.
    2. It annoys my wife and I enough that it's worth it to get a quieter, cooler fan.
    3. Intel releases a fix to the processor (many have requested a fix be provided, though I have no idea how they would fix a hardware temperature issue other than to intentionally cap the processor usage/speed).

  6. #26
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Be careful, so your wife doesn't throw both you and the computer out of the house.

  7. #27
    writhziden's Avatar
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Doing a little more research and more measuring, this is the best cooling I can get for this system. Unfortunately, Gigabyte has some housing right where a bigger fan would need to go, so the bigger fans/pipes/fins probably would not fit on this motherboard. I don't think it's a deal breaker, though. I added a second fan to the fins, and the temperatures dropped another 5 C during normal use. They still get to 70 C under 100% load, but that's not that high for this CPU. Other reviews I've read have said that the lids used on these CPUs are connected to the case in a manner that limits thermal dissipation, so without delidding the chip, I probably won't see much better temperatures.

    I'll just have to bear the noise from the fans from time to time or make sure music/tv/movies/etc. are on in the background.

  8. #28
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    Re: Building a new PC

    A good, cheap solution would be to replace the stock with a Noctua NF-F12. I was unhappy with the noise of my Corsair H60, but swapping out the fan for an NF-F12 made it dead silent.

    I'd recommend looking at an AIO, they're normally quieter and perform better. Plus they have small CPU blocks that won't have any issue fitting on around annoying blocks on the mobo
    writhziden says thanks for this.


  9. #29
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    Re: Building a new PC

    I agree, sounds good.

  10. #30
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Tekno Venus View Post
    A good, cheap solution would be to replace the stock with a Noctua NF-F12. I was unhappy with the noise of my Corsair H60, but swapping out the fan for an NF-F12 made it dead silent.

    I'd recommend looking at an AIO, they're normally quieter and perform better. Plus they have small CPU blocks that won't have any issue fitting on around annoying blocks on the mobo
    I'll keep the Noctua NF-F12 in mind. I'm not sure how it would mount to the fins, though. The current fans have clips on them.

    I avoid AIO. I've seen too many display cards killed by a leak.

  11. #31
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Easy Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO + Noctua NF-F12 PWM - YouTube

    Really? I've never seen any issues with AIOs, especially not nowadays. They're a really well established market nowadays.
    writhziden says thanks for this.


  12. #32
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Tekno Venus View Post
    Easy Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO + Noctua NF-F12 PWM - YouTube

    Really? I've never seen any issues with AIOs, especially not nowadays. They're a really well established market nowadays.
    It was one of the first AIOs that I witnessed firsthand, and I saw several forum threads with similar experiences from other users around the same time. They may be better now, but I'd still lean toward air cooling over water cooling as being safer.

    If these fans end up being replaced, I only have one set of brackets and I would like to continue with the two fan setup. Based on your suggestion, I am leaning toward Amazon.com: Noctua L-Type Premium Quiet CPU Cooler_ Retail Cooling NH-L9x65: Electronics which has high reviews including one 7700k user who said temps were 55 C at 100% load. It has the added bonus that it's a top down cooler, so less space issues, and it will probably do a better job of keeping the motherboard components around the CPU cooler.

  13. #33
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    Re: Building a new PC

    I agree, I avoid AiOs, but the fans idea is worth a try :) I have had nothing but good experiences with Noctua.

  14. #34
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    Re: Building a new PC

    I have very good airflow through the system with two 120mm pulling air in across the board and one 92mm pushing warmer air back out.
    It does not matter how much cool air you jam into the case, if you don't exhaust it out, heat builds up. I would move one of those 120mm fans to the back to increase pulling heated air out and see how your temps do (which I agree, are not bad - but I would like those highs to come down a bit too).

    Did you apply as thin a layer of TIM (thermal interface material) as possible? It is important to note the best transfer of heat occurs with direct metal to metal contact. The purpose of TIM is to only fill the microscopic pits and valleys in the mating surfaces to push any trapped insulating air out. Any excess TIM is actually in the way and counterproductive to heat transfer efficiency. Also, depending on the TIM formulation, some TIMs require a curing period where over a few days of heat-up/cool-down cycles, temps can come down by as much as 4 - 5.

    You also stated some concern over how fast the temps go from cool to peak highs. I'm not surprised. It only takes a few clock cycles for CPU temps to go from cool to over heated. And since that i7-7700k cruises long at 4.2 billion cycles per second, a lot can happen in 1 second. And because fans are mechanical devices, it takes time for even the best fans to compensate - which they don't begin to do until the BIOS senses, then directs the fan speed to ramp up. So rapid temperature increases can be expected - but temperature drops should be nearly as quick as well.

    I agree that AiO coolers are much better than they used to be, but anything with hoses can develop leaks, either at the fittings or even the hoses can be punctured, flawed, or over time become brittle and crack.

    I personally don't like water cooling solutions - though my position is probably biased based on past history and experience with clients, and not any recent problems.

    1. Too often after new builds with alternative cooling, users are extremely diligent at performing regular inspections to make sure there are no leaks and everything is working fine. The problem is, after a year or two of no problems found, those regular inspections fall by the wayside right when components start to age and inspections should increase! We saw many older systems that developed leaks, some causing severe (and scary) damage, some where the coolant just evaporated, and even a couple where really nasty mold took over.

    2. Designers intentionally cluster heat sensitive and heat generating devices around the processor socket where they can take advantage of the air turbulence provided by the processor fan. If the user does not properly address case cooling to provide an adequate flow of cool air through the case, those devices may not receive sufficient cooling. This can result in instability or increased aging. Back in the day when electrolytic caps were commonly used, this may have resulted in leaky or bulging capacitors at a higher rate than those boards using conventional/OEM cooling.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
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  15. #35
    Tekno Venus's Avatar
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    Re: Building a new PC

    [QUOTE=Digerati;185696]
    Any excess TIM is actually in the way and counterproductive to heat transfer efficiency.
    I watched an interesting video about TIM a while back, the results from their experiments were very interesting. Obviously it's just one experiment, but I was surprised at the results.



    Basically... thermal paste application technique isn't quite as important as you think
    writhziden says thanks for this.


  16. #36
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    I have very good airflow through the system with two 120mm pulling air in across the board and one 92mm pushing warmer air back out.
    It does not matter how much cool air you jam into the case, if you don't exhaust it out, heat builds up. I would move one of those 120mm fans to the back to increase pulling heated air out and see how your temps do (which I agree, are not bad - but I would like those highs to come down a bit too).
    I could probably put a couple fans on top or on the side of the case to vent heat out. The case is pretty well ventilated even with only one exhaust fan. It has plenty of exhaust vents, and I feel a good airflow of warm air coming out the top/sides of it from the CPU fans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    Did you apply as thin a layer of TIM (thermal interface material) as possible? It is important to note the best transfer of heat occurs with direct metal to metal contact. The purpose of TIM is to only fill the microscopic pits and valleys in the mating surfaces to push any trapped insulating air out. Any excess TIM is actually in the way and counterproductive to heat transfer efficiency. Also, depending on the TIM formulation, some TIMs require a curing period where over a few days of heat-up/cool-down cycles, temps can come down by as much as 4 - 5.
    I put a pea sized amount on and smoothed it to an extremely thin layer using a credit card to collect excess while keeping it evenly distributed.

    Maybe overkill based on Stephen's post, but that's how I was taught.

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    You also stated some concern over how fast the temps go from cool to peak highs. I'm not surprised. It only takes a few clock cycles for CPU temps to go from cool to over heated. And since that i7-7700k cruises long at 4.2 billion cycles per second, a lot can happen in 1 second. And because fans are mechanical devices, it takes time for even the best fans to compensate - which they don't begin to do until the BIOS senses, then directs the fan speed to ramp up. So rapid temperature increases can be expected - but temperature drops should be nearly as quick as well.
    Yes, it goes from 25 C to 50 C quickly and almost as quickly back down to 25 C.

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    I agree that AiO coolers are much better than they used to be, but anything with hoses can develop leaks, either at the fittings or even the hoses can be punctured, flawed, or over time become brittle and crack.

    I personally don't like water cooling solutions - though my position is probably biased based on past history and experience with clients, and not any recent problems.

    1. Too often after new builds with alternative cooling, users are extremely diligent at performing regular inspections to make sure there are no leaks and everything is working fine. The problem is, after a year or two of no problems found, those regular inspections fall by the wayside right when components start to age and inspections should increase! We saw many older systems that developed leaks, some causing severe (and scary) damage, some where the coolant just evaporated, and even a couple where really nasty mold took over.

    2. Designers intentionally cluster heat sensitive and heat generating devices around the processor socket where they can take advantage of the air turbulence provided by the processor fan. If the user does not properly address case cooling to provide an adequate flow of cool air through the case, those devices may not receive sufficient cooling. This can result in instability or increased aging. Back in the day when electrolytic caps were commonly used, this may have resulted in leaky or bulging capacitors at a higher rate than those boards using conventional/OEM cooling.
    Yep, that's why I'm considering getting a top down cooling solution. My motherboard temperatures don't seem too high (most temperatures are in the 30s; there is one around 70-75 C when the processor is in use, which is probably a sensor near the processor).

  17. #37
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    Re: Building a new PC

    Thanks for that video. The results were interesting, for sure. Too bad they did not state which TIM they were using.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
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  18. #38
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    Re: Building a new PC

    It was IC Diamond


  19. #39
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      • Model Number:
        BWS-6 E-IV
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i5-6600 Skylake Pushed to 3.9GHz
      • Memory:
        2 X 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000
      • Graphics:
        EVGA GeForce GTX 1050TI 04G-P4-6251-KR, 4GB GDDR5
      • Sound Card:
        Integrated
      • Disk Drives:
        Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Blu-ray R/W
      • Power Supply:
        EVGA Supernova 550W Gold
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define R4 Mid Tower w/Window
      • Cooling:
        2 x 140mm case fans, OEM CPU Cooler
      • Display:
        2 x Samsung S24E650BW 24 inch WS
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit

    Re: Building a new PC

    Did he say that, or did you recognize the tube? I note too there are a couple different IC Diamond formulas too.

    Hmmm, Malwarebytes keeps yelling at me when I visit the innovationcooling.com website.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    MS MVP 2007 - 2018

    Heat is the bane of all electronics!

  20. #40
    Tekno Venus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    UK
    Age
    20
    Posts
    5,909
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom Built
      • Motherboard:
        ASUS Z170I ITX
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i7 6700K
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4
      • Hard Drives:
        500GB Samsung 850 EVO, 2TB Seagate HDD
      • Power Supply:
        450W Corsair SFX
      • Case:
        Silverstone SG13 ITX
      • Cooling:
        Corsair H60i
      • Display:
        Dell U2715H - 2160x1440 27 inch
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro x64

    Re: Building a new PC

    He didn't say, but that's the thermal paste of choice on that channel and has been for years. I recognised the tube he was using.
    Last edited by Tekno Venus; 07-28-2017 at 01:17 PM.


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