1. #1
    jcgriff2's Avatar
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        HP ENVY TouchSmart 17-j130us Notebook - E8A04UA
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        Intel Core i7-4700MQ Processor with Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz.
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        12GB DDR3L SDRAM (2 DIMM)
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        1TB 5400RPM hard drive with HP ProtectSmart Hard Drive Protection
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    PSU Test

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  2. #2
    Moderator
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    softwaremaniac's Avatar
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      • Motherboard:
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        Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC 4K 3840x2160
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    Re: PSU Test

    Excellent :)

  3. #3
    Digerati's Avatar
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        BrightWorks Systems
      • Model Number:
        BWS-6 E-IV
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i5-6600 Skylake Pushed to 3.9GHz
      • Memory:
        2 X 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000
      • Graphics:
        EVGA GeForce GTX 1050TI 04G-P4-6251-KR, 4GB GDDR5
      • Sound Card:
        Integrated
      • Disk Drives:
        Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Blu-ray R/W
      • Power Supply:
        EVGA Supernova 550W Gold
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define R4 Mid Tower w/Window
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        2 x 140mm case fans, OEM CPU Cooler
      • Display:
        2 x Samsung S24E650BW 24 inch WS
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit

    Re: PSU Test

    Not buying that for a PSU test. To properly test a PSU, it needs to be under a variety of realistic loads, then measured with sophisticated test equipment such as an oscilloscope and power supply analyzer to view the output waveforms for stability, voltage tolerances and [very importantly] ripple. Other testing criteria include hot-box tests (stability in 40 - 50C operating environments), in-rush current, and hold-up times, as well as efficiency - all things that OCCT test cannot do.

    The description of that PSU test, "...to get the most out of your Power Supply", makes no sense. You want out of your power supply exactly and ONLY what the connected devices demand at any given point in time. No more, no less. For those reasons, a proper PSU test can only be done in a properly equipped testing facility by properly trained personal who can understand and interpret the results. Therefore, all "normal" users can do is make sure they have a supply with enough horsepower and if the quality/reliability of the output is in doubt, swap in a known good PSU to see if problems remain or go away.

    To make sure the size is adequate, for experts and the less experienced alike, I recommend the use of a good PSU calculator and IMO, the best (by a long shot) is the eXtreme Power Supply Calculator. The developers are constantly updating their databases as new CPUs and graphics solutions hit the market ensuring this calculator remains current and accurate. And it offers users extensive flexibility for factoring in abundant combinations of RAM, fans, drives, alternative cooling solutions, and more. And then it also recommends a suitable UPS size as well.

    Because this calculator is so flexible, it does not grossly overestimate recommendations as other calculators do.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    MS MVP Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

    Heat is the bane of all electronics!

  4. #4
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    softwaremaniac's Avatar
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        Asus Xonar DSX
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      • Case:
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        CoolerMaster Arctic Freezer 7 Pro
      • Display:
        Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC 4K 3840x2160
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 1703 x64

    Re: PSU Test

    I tend to agree, but also think that the best way to test a PSU is to swap it out for another one. No tool can be as accurate as the good old PSU swap. This software is just a first test to see what it says and is by no means conclusive, although, I have found it pretty reliable in most cases.
    And I agree with the site recommendation, have been using it for years.

  5. #5
    Wrench97's Avatar
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    Re: PSU Test

    Yea I've never seen any value to that test software.

  6. #6
    writhziden's Avatar
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      • Manufacturer:
        Sony
      • Model Number:
        VPCF232FX/B
      • Motherboard:
        Sony Corporation VAIO
      • CPU:
      • Memory:
        8.00 GB Crucial CT2KIT51264BF1339 DDR3 1333
      • Graphics:
      • Sound Card:
        Realtek High Definition Audio/nVidia High Definition Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        TOSHIBA MK5061GSY 500 GB (465 GB actual)
      • Case:
        Laptop black matte case with backlit keyboard
      • Cooling:
        Air cooling via fan and heat exchanger heatsink
      • Display:
        Laptop display
      • Operating System:
        Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit

    Re: PSU Test

    Quote Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
    Not buying that for a PSU test. To properly test a PSU, it needs to be under a variety of realistic loads, then measured with sophisticated test equipment such as an oscilloscope and power supply analyzer to view the output waveforms for stability, voltage tolerances and [very importantly] ripple. Other testing criteria include hot-box tests (stability in 40 - 50C operating environments), in-rush current, and hold-up times, as well as efficiency - all things that OCCT test cannot do.

    The description of that PSU test, "...to get the most out of your Power Supply", makes no sense. You want out of your power supply exactly and ONLY what the connected devices demand at any given point in time. No more, no less. For those reasons, a proper PSU test can only be done in a properly equipped testing facility by properly trained personal who can understand and interpret the results. Therefore, all "normal" users can do is make sure they have a supply with enough horsepower and if the quality/reliability of the output is in doubt, swap in a known good PSU to see if problems remain or go away.

    To make sure the size is adequate, for experts and the less experienced alike, I recommend the use of a good PSU calculator and IMO, the best (by a long shot) is the eXtreme Power Supply Calculator. The developers are constantly updating their databases as new CPUs and graphics solutions hit the market ensuring this calculator remains current and accurate. And it offers users extensive flexibility for factoring in abundant combinations of RAM, fans, drives, alternative cooling solutions, and more. And then it also recommends a suitable UPS size as well.

    Because this calculator is so flexible, it does not grossly overestimate recommendations as other calculators do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wrench97 View Post
    Yea I've never seen any value to that test software.
    It is not meant to be a true test in the way you two are viewing it. It is just meant to see how the PSU handles two key components under full load: the CPU and GPU. It doesn't guarantee the PSU is fine if it passes, but it seems like it would be a good tool to test scenarios where users are seeing their system shut down when running high resource intensive tasks.

  7. #7
    Digerati's Avatar
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        BrightWorks Systems
      • Model Number:
        BWS-6 E-IV
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte GA-Z170-HD3
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i5-6600 Skylake Pushed to 3.9GHz
      • Memory:
        2 X 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000
      • Graphics:
        EVGA GeForce GTX 1050TI 04G-P4-6251-KR, 4GB GDDR5
      • Sound Card:
        Integrated
      • Disk Drives:
        Samsung 850 Pro 256GB SSD, 850 EVO 250GB SSD, Blu-ray R/W
      • Power Supply:
        EVGA Supernova 550W Gold
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define R4 Mid Tower w/Window
      • Cooling:
        2 x 140mm case fans, OEM CPU Cooler
      • Display:
        2 x Samsung S24E650BW 24 inch WS
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit

    Re: PSU Test

    It is not meant to be a true test in the way you two are viewing it. It is just meant to see how the PSU handles two key components under full load: the CPU and GPU. It doesn't guarantee the PSU is fine if it passes, but it seems like it would be a good tool to test scenarios where users are seeing their system shut down when running high resource intensive tasks.
    I just don't see it as a test of the PSU. There are many things that can cause a system to shutdown unexpectedly. There are no monitored sensors in power supplies or on motherboards that monitor voltages for tolerance adherence. So if there is a sudden shutdown caused by the power supply, there is no logging to point fingers at the power supply.
    Bill (AFE7Ret)
    Freedom is NOT Free!
    MS MVP Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

    Heat is the bane of all electronics!

  8. #8
    writhziden's Avatar
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Sony
      • Model Number:
        VPCF232FX/B
      • Motherboard:
        Sony Corporation VAIO
      • CPU:
      • Memory:
        8.00 GB Crucial CT2KIT51264BF1339 DDR3 1333
      • Graphics:
      • Sound Card:
        Realtek High Definition Audio/nVidia High Definition Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        TOSHIBA MK5061GSY 500 GB (465 GB actual)
      • Case:
        Laptop black matte case with backlit keyboard
      • Cooling:
        Air cooling via fan and heat exchanger heatsink
      • Display:
        Laptop display
      • Operating System:
        Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit

    Re: PSU Test

    True, but at least it provides a place to start.

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