1. #1

    Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Hi!

    Happy to be here and join this community!

    I seem to be having a lot of BSOD issues, particulary PFN_LIST_CORRUPT but sometimes others as well.

    I was wondering if anyone could help guide me to resolve this issue!

    Thank you so much in advance!


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  2. #2

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes

    Hi,

    Please refer to the following and reply back accordingly with the required information - http://www.sysnative.com/forums/bsod...ows-vista.html

    Regards,

    Patrick

  3. #3

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Hi,

    Please refer to the following and reply back accordingly with the required information - http://www.sysnative.com/forums/bsod...ows-vista.html

    Regards,

    Patrick
    Hi,

    Thank you very much for your reply and help.

    See attached.

    OS - Windows 8.1, 8, 7, Vista ? Windows 8 (6.2 Build 9200)
    x86 (32-bit) or x64 ? 64-bit
    What was original installed OS on system? This was the original.
    Is the OS an OEM version (came pre-installed on system) or full retail version (YOU purchased it from retailer)? Full retail. Purchased to install when I custom built the PC.
    Age of system (hardware) Around 1 year
    Age of OS installation - have you re-installed the OS? Nope

    CPU Intel Core i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz (8 CPUs)
    Video Card GeForce GTX 680
    MotherBoard ASUSTeK
    Power Supply - brand & wattage (if laptop, skip this one) I am not sure about this one

    System Manufacturer ASUSTeK
    Exact model number (if laptop, check label on bottom) None since its custom built

    Laptop or Desktop? Desktop

  4. #4

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes

    Thanks for the information!

    Is your Qualcomm Atheros AR938x Wireless Network Adapter disabled on purpose?

    We have a few different bug checks:

    PFN_LIST_CORRUPT (4e)

    This indicates that the page frame number (PFN) list is corrupted.

    This error is typically caused by a driver passing a bad memory descriptor list. For example, the driver might have called MmUnlockPages twice with the same list.

    VIDEO_SCHEDULER_INTERNAL_ERROR (119)

    This indicates that the video scheduler has detected a fatal violation.

    Code:
    0: kd> kv
    Child-SP          RetAddr           : Args to Child                                                           : Call Site
    fffff803`38dd6478 fffff880`03b8f55d : 00000000`00000119 00000000`07000000 fffffa80`09be2400 fffffa80`07d294c0 : nt!KeBugCheckEx
    fffff803`38dd6480 fffff880`03bac163 : fffffa80`099dd750 fffffa80`07d294c0 fffffa80`09be2b18 fffff880`03ba9c00 : watchdog!WdLogEvent5_WdCriticalError+0xcd
    fffff803`38dd64c0 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : dxgmms1!VidSchiCheckConditionDeviceCommand+0xdb
    ^^ DirectX MMS calling into a watchdog error routine.

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)

    This indicates that invalid system memory has been referenced.

    Bug check 0x50 usually occurs after the installation of faulty hardware or in the event of failure of installed hardware (usually related to defective RAM, be it main memory, L2 RAM cache, or video RAM).

    BugCheck 50, {fffff6fb40004000, 0, 0, 6}

    Another common cause is the installation of a faulty system service.

    Antivirus software can also trigger this error, as can a corrupted NTFS volume.

    Code:
    4: kd> r cr2
    cr2=fffff6fb40004000
    Code:
    4: kd> !pte fffff6fb40004000
                                               VA fffff68000800000
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDF68    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBED000    PDE at FFFFF6FB7DA00020    PTE at FFFFF6FB40004000
    contains 800000004CB92863  contains 14900000334E5867  contains 0000000000000000
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff8019e7730e4
    pfn 4cb92     ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff8019e7730e4
    pfn 334e5     ---DA--UWEV  not valid
    ^^ 1st parameter = fffff6fb40004000, which is an invalid address.

    3rd parameter = 0 either because it's a bad address, or the crash didn't happen to collect enough info.

    ----------------------

    1. Remove and replace AVG with Windows 8's built-in Windows Defender for temporary troubleshooting purposes as it may be causing conflicts:

    AVG removal - http://www.avg.com/us-en/utilities

    Windows Defender (how to turn on after removal) - Windows Defender - Turn On or Off in Windows 8

    2.

    Code:
    0: kd> lmvm dadder
    start             end                 module name
    fffff880`05567000 fffff880`0556a180   dadder     (deferred)             
        Image path: \SystemRoot\system32\drivers\dadder.sys
        Image name: dadder.sys
        Timestamp:        Thu Aug 02 05:33:03 2007
    ^^ DeathAdder Mouse driver, dated 2007. Update it ASAP - Razer Support

    3. Ensure you have the latest video card drivers. If you are already on the latest video card drivers, uninstall and install a version or a few versions behind the latest to ensure it's not a latest driver only issue. If you have already experimented with the latest video card driver and many previous versions, please give the beta driver for your card a try.

    Regards,

    Patrick
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  5. #5

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Thanks for the information!

    Is your Qualcomm Atheros AR938x Wireless Network Adapter disabled on purpose?

    We have a few different bug checks:

    PFN_LIST_CORRUPT (4e)

    This indicates that the page frame number (PFN) list is corrupted.

    This error is typically caused by a driver passing a bad memory descriptor list. For example, the driver might have called MmUnlockPages twice with the same list.

    VIDEO_SCHEDULER_INTERNAL_ERROR (119)

    This indicates that the video scheduler has detected a fatal violation.

    Code:
    0: kd> kv
    Child-SP          RetAddr           : Args to Child                                                           : Call Site
    fffff803`38dd6478 fffff880`03b8f55d : 00000000`00000119 00000000`07000000 fffffa80`09be2400 fffffa80`07d294c0 : nt!KeBugCheckEx
    fffff803`38dd6480 fffff880`03bac163 : fffffa80`099dd750 fffffa80`07d294c0 fffffa80`09be2b18 fffff880`03ba9c00 : watchdog!WdLogEvent5_WdCriticalError+0xcd
    fffff803`38dd64c0 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : dxgmms1!VidSchiCheckConditionDeviceCommand+0xdb
    ^^ DirectX MMS calling into a watchdog error routine.

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)

    This indicates that invalid system memory has been referenced.

    Bug check 0x50 usually occurs after the installation of faulty hardware or in the event of failure of installed hardware (usually related to defective RAM, be it main memory, L2 RAM cache, or video RAM).

    BugCheck 50, {fffff6fb40004000, 0, 0, 6}

    Another common cause is the installation of a faulty system service.

    Antivirus software can also trigger this error, as can a corrupted NTFS volume.

    Code:
    4: kd> r cr2
    cr2=fffff6fb40004000
    Code:
    4: kd> !pte fffff6fb40004000
                                               VA fffff68000800000
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDF68    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBED000    PDE at FFFFF6FB7DA00020    PTE at FFFFF6FB40004000
    contains 800000004CB92863  contains 14900000334E5867  contains 0000000000000000
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff8019e7730e4
    pfn 4cb92     ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff8019e7730e4
    pfn 334e5     ---DA--UWEV  not valid
    ^^ 1st parameter = fffff6fb40004000, which is an invalid address.

    3rd parameter = 0 either because it's a bad address, or the crash didn't happen to collect enough info.

    ----------------------

    1. Remove and replace AVG with Windows 8's built-in Windows Defender for temporary troubleshooting purposes as it may be causing conflicts:

    AVG removal - http://www.avg.com/us-en/utilities

    Windows Defender (how to turn on after removal) - Windows Defender - Turn On or Off in Windows 8

    2.

    Code:
    0: kd> lmvm dadder
    start             end                 module name
    fffff880`05567000 fffff880`0556a180   dadder     (deferred)             
        Image path: \SystemRoot\system32\drivers\dadder.sys
        Image name: dadder.sys
        Timestamp:        Thu Aug 02 05:33:03 2007
    ^^ DeathAdder Mouse driver, dated 2007. Update it ASAP - Razer Support

    3. Ensure you have the latest video card drivers. If you are already on the latest video card drivers, uninstall and install a version or a few versions behind the latest to ensure it's not a latest driver only issue. If you have already experimented with the latest video card driver and many previous versions, please give the beta driver for your card a try.

    Regards,

    Patrick
    Hi!

    Wow very fast response, cheers!

    Yes I disabled my wireless adapter because it was interfering with my ethernet connection (have both wifi and ethernet).

    I've done all the steps such as removing AVG, turning on windows defender, getting Razer Synapse 2.0 update as well as updating driver to latest version (I didn't do the latest update). Do you recommend I purchase Norton/Macafee instead?

    I've also done driver verifier: Driver Verifier - BSOD related - Windows 8.1, 8, 7 & Vista - Sysnative Forums as per the instructions on: http://www.sysnative.com/forums/bsod...ows-vista.html but I did not do the HDD diagnostics or RAM test (note that I do not have blank CD to burn CD).

  6. #6

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    My pleasure, please keep me updated!

    Do you recommend I purchase Norton/Macafee instead?
    No, not right now.

    I've also done driver verifier:
    If after enabling you don't crash within ~24 hrs, disable it.

    Regards,

    Patrick

  7. #7

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    My pleasure, please keep me updated!

    Do you recommend I purchase Norton/Macafee instead?
    No, not right now.

    I've also done driver verifier:
    If after enabling you don't crash within ~24 hrs, disable it.

    Regards,

    Patrick
    Hi, I just had another BSOD crash reason: PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA

    Looks a bit more like a hardware issue now?

  8. #8

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Can you attach the latest crash dump, please?

    Regards,

    Patrick

  9. #9
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    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Additional Information:

    In my opinion, it's most likely to be software related. CR2 (Control Register 2) contains the address which the program attempted to access or the Page Fault Linear Address (PFLA).

    Code:
    4: kd> .trap fffff880`0bafb330
    NOTE: The trap frame does not contain all registers.
    Some register values may be zeroed or incorrect.
    rax=0000000000004000 rbx=0000000000000000 rcx=fffff8019e41b000
    rdx=0000000000000000 rsi=0000000000000000 rdi=0000000000000000
    rip=fffff8019e68c86c rsp=fffff8800bafb4c0 rbp=fffff8800bafb539
     r8=fffff6fb40000000  r9=0000000000000001 r10=fffff88001559000
    r11=0000000000000174 r12=0000000000000000 r13=0000000000000000
    r14=0000000000000000 r15=0000000000000000
    iopl=0         nv up ei pl nz na po nc
    nt!ExFreePoolWithTag+0x70c:
    fffff801`9e68c86c 4a8b0400        mov     rax,qword ptr [rax+r8] ds:fffff6fb`40004000=????????????????
    From my understanding, it seems that the address for the corresponding non-paged pool was being paged out rather than paged in. The !pool extension and the _POOL_HEADER really seem to give something which possibly indicates a paged out address, especially with the IRQL Level being Passive, so we're not experiencing any interrupt level problems.

    Code:
    4: kd> !irql
    Debugger saved IRQL for processor 0x4 -- 0 (LOW_LEVEL)
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  10. #10

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Can you attach the latest crash dump, please?

    Regards,

    Patrick

  11. #11

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    I was actually inclined to agree with Harry (as usual) that software was a possibility as well, but since you've just attached the latest crash dumps, I now don't think so. Here's why:

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)
    bug check as we've seen.

    This indicates that invalid system memory has been referenced.

    Bug check 0x50 usually occurs after the installation of faulty hardware or in the event of failure of installed hardware (usually related to defective RAM, be it main memory, L2 RAM cache, or video RAM).

    Another common cause is the installation of a faulty system service.

    Antivirus software can also trigger this error, as can a corrupted NTFS volume.



    BugCheck 50, {fffffa806589b700, 0, fffff803fd7133d4, 2}

    ^^ Address fffffa806589b700 was written to by the instruction at address fffff803fd7133d4.

    Code:
    6: kd> r cr2
    cr2=fffffa806589b700
    ^^ The 1st parameter address was stored in cr2 prior to calling the page fault handler.

    Code:
    6: kd> !pte fffffa806589b700
                                               VA fffffa806589b700
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDFA8    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBF5008    PDE at FFFFF6FB7EA01960    PTE at FFFFF6FD4032C4D8
    contains 000000021EFFF863  contains 0000000000000000
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 21efff    ---DA--KWEV  not valid
    ^^ We can see from the above that the address fffffa806589b700 is indeed invalid. With this said, why did fffffa806589b700 attempt to write to fffff803fd7133d4?

    Given this is not a kernel-dump, we cannot kv to check the trapfame on a pagefault. We can try and dump the registers for the bugcheck:

    Code:
    6: kd> r
    rax=0000000000000002 rbx=0000000000000000 rcx=0000000000000050
    rdx=fffffa806589b700 rsi=fffff88002f32660 rdi=0000000000000000
    rip=fffff803fd6e4440 rsp=fffff88002f324f8 rbp=fffff88002f32611
     r8=0000000000000000  r9=fffff88002f326e0 r10=fffffa8006705700
    r11=fffffa806589b700 r12=0000000000000000 r13=fffff88002f326e0
    r14=0000000000000000 r15=fffffa806589b700
    iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na po nc
    cs=0010  ss=0018  ds=002b  es=002b  fs=0053  gs=002b             efl=00000246
    nt!KeBugCheckEx:
    fffff803`fd6e4440 48894c2408      mov     qword ptr [rsp+8],rcx ss:0018:fffff880`02f32500=0000000000000050
    ^^ On the instruction we failed on, address fffff803`fd6e4440 deferenced rsp where rsp is fffff88002f324f8. All of this would result in a memory write to the address fffff880`02f32500.

    Code:
    6: kd> !pte fffff880`02f32500
                                               VA fffff88002f32500
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDF88    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBF1000    PDE at FFFFF6FB7E2000B8    PTE at FFFFF6FC40017990
    contains 00000002189A5863  contains 00000002189A4863  contains 0000000001E78863  contains 80000000031D0963
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 2189a5    ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 2189a4    ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 1e78      ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 31d0      -G-DA--KWEV
    Code:
    6: kd> dd fffff880`02f32500
    fffff880`02f32500  00000050 00000000 6589b700 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32510  00000000 00000000 02f326e0 fffff880
    fffff880`02f32520  00000002 00000000 065eb840 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32530  00ff64e4 fffff880 06705700 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32540  02f32611 fffff880 0000007f 00000000
    fffff880`02f32550  00000001 00000000 fd7c3acf fffff803
    fffff880`02f32560  00000000 00000000 080e2080 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32570  02f32600 fffff880 00000000 00000000
    Right, so the code wanted to write to fffff880`02f32500 which as we can see above is a completely valid address. The 1st parameter and cr2 however note we failed writing to address fffffa806589b700. This does not make sense, and is essentially not logically possible.

    The hardware was told to write to fffff880`02f32500, and the hardware came back and said 'I cannot write to fffffa806589b700'. Another way to think about it is if you kindly asked the waiter of your table for more water, he writes it down, but comes back and says 'I'm sorry, but we're all out of coffee'.



    Also, this was a verifier enabled crash dump -- DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID: VERIFIER_ENABLED_VISTA_MINIDUMP

    Code:
    Verify Level 2092b ... enabled options are:
        Special pool
        Special irql
        All pool allocations checked on unload
        Deadlock detection enabled
        Security checks enabled
        Miscellaneous checks enabled
    
    Summary of All Verifier Statistics
    
    RaiseIrqls                             0x0
    AcquireSpinLocks                       0xfbf4b4
    Synch Executions                       0x124b88
    Trims                                  0xa77
    
    Pool Allocations Attempted             0x28395e
    Pool Allocations Succeeded             0x28395e
    Pool Allocations Succeeded SpecialPool 0x28395e
    Pool Allocations With NO TAG           0x26
    Pool Allocations Failed                0x0
    Resource Allocations Failed Deliberately   0x0
    
    Current paged pool allocations         0xa8 for 00100740 bytes
    Peak paged pool allocations            0xbc for 002387F0 bytes
    Current nonpaged pool allocations      0x6eb9 for 0099F300 bytes
    Peak nonpaged pool allocations         0x6f4f for 009B0B08 bytes
    With this said, I believe best course of action should be to run Memtest for NO LESS than ~8 passes (several hours):

    Memtest86+:

    Download Memtest86+ here:

    Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

    Which should I download?

    You can either download the pre-compiled ISO that you would burn to a CD and then boot from the CD, or you can download the auto-installer for the USB key. What this will do is format your USB drive, make it a bootable device, and then install the necessary files. Both do the same job, it's just up to you which you choose, or which you have available (whether it's CD or USB).

    Do note that some older generation motherboards do not support USB-based booting, therefore your only option is CD (or Floppy if you really wanted to).

    How Memtest works:

    Memtest86 writes a series of test patterns to most memory addresses, reads back the data written, and compares it for errors.

    The default pass does 9 different tests, varying in access patterns and test data. A tenth test, bit fade, is selectable from the menu. It writes all memory with zeroes, then sleeps for 90 minutes before checking to see if bits have changed (perhaps because of refresh problems). This is repeated with all ones for a total time of 3 hours per pass.

    Many chipsets can report RAM speeds and timings via SPD (Serial Presence Detect) or EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles), and some even support changing the expected memory speed. If the expected memory speed is overclocked, Memtest86 can test that memory performance is error-free with these faster settings.

    Some hardware is able to report the "PAT status" (PAT: enabled or PAT: disabled). This is a reference to Intel Performance acceleration technology; there may be BIOS settings which affect this aspect of memory timing.

    This information, if available to the program, can be displayed via a menu option.

    Any other questions, they can most likely be answered by reading this great guide here:

    FAQ : please read before posting

    especially with the IRQL Level being Passive, so we're not experiencing any interrupt level problems.

    Code:
    4: kd> !irql
    Debugger saved IRQL for processor 0x4 -- 0 (LOW_LEVEL)
    I've recently read on the ntdebugging blog that according to Windows Internals 4th edition, despite what !irql reports, in most cases it's not properly saved at the time of the crash, especially in minidumps.

    Windows Internals 4th Edition notes that IRQL may not be saved; this explains the 0
    Regards,

    Patrick
    Last edited by Patrick; 04-12-2014 at 12:36 PM.
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  12. #12

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Hi!

    I ran for 8 passes and got 1 error and then left it for another 9 hours and got 6 errors in total.

    How do I go about displaying the report?



    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    I was actually inclined to agree with Harry (as usual) that software was a possibility as well, but since you've just attached the latest crash dumps, I now don't think so. Here's why:

    PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA (50)
    bug check as we've seen.

    This indicates that invalid system memory has been referenced.

    Bug check 0x50 usually occurs after the installation of faulty hardware or in the event of failure of installed hardware (usually related to defective RAM, be it main memory, L2 RAM cache, or video RAM).

    Another common cause is the installation of a faulty system service.

    Antivirus software can also trigger this error, as can a corrupted NTFS volume.



    BugCheck 50, {fffffa806589b700, 0, fffff803fd7133d4, 2}

    ^^ Address fffffa806589b700 was written to by the instruction at address fffff803fd7133d4.

    Code:
    6: kd> r cr2
    cr2=fffffa806589b700
    ^^ The 1st parameter address was stored in cr2 prior to calling the page fault handler.

    Code:
    6: kd> !pte fffffa806589b700
                                               VA fffffa806589b700
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDFA8    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBF5008    PDE at FFFFF6FB7EA01960    PTE at FFFFF6FD4032C4D8
    contains 000000021EFFF863  contains 0000000000000000
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 21efff    ---DA--KWEV  not valid
    ^^ We can see from the above that the address fffffa806589b700 is indeed invalid. With this said, why did fffffa806589b700 attempt to write to fffff803fd7133d4?

    Given this is not a kernel-dump, we cannot kv to check the trapfame on a pagefault. We can try and dump the registers for the bugcheck:

    Code:
    6: kd> r
    rax=0000000000000002 rbx=0000000000000000 rcx=0000000000000050
    rdx=fffffa806589b700 rsi=fffff88002f32660 rdi=0000000000000000
    rip=fffff803fd6e4440 rsp=fffff88002f324f8 rbp=fffff88002f32611
     r8=0000000000000000  r9=fffff88002f326e0 r10=fffffa8006705700
    r11=fffffa806589b700 r12=0000000000000000 r13=fffff88002f326e0
    r14=0000000000000000 r15=fffffa806589b700
    iopl=0         nv up ei pl zr na po nc
    cs=0010  ss=0018  ds=002b  es=002b  fs=0053  gs=002b             efl=00000246
    nt!KeBugCheckEx:
    fffff803`fd6e4440 48894c2408      mov     qword ptr [rsp+8],rcx ss:0018:fffff880`02f32500=0000000000000050
    ^^ On the instruction we failed on, address fffff803`fd6e4440 deferenced rsp where rsp is fffff88002f324f8. All of this would result in a memory write to the address fffff880`02f32500.

    Code:
    6: kd> !pte fffff880`02f32500
                                               VA fffff88002f32500
    PXE at FFFFF6FB7DBEDF88    PPE at FFFFF6FB7DBF1000    PDE at FFFFF6FB7E2000B8    PTE at FFFFF6FC40017990
    contains 00000002189A5863  contains 00000002189A4863  contains 0000000001E78863  contains 80000000031D0963
    GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 2189a5    ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 2189a4    ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 1e78      ---DA--KWEV  GetUlongFromAddress: unable to read from fffff803fd9e20e4
    pfn 31d0      -G-DA--KWEV
    Code:
    6: kd> dd fffff880`02f32500
    fffff880`02f32500  00000050 00000000 6589b700 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32510  00000000 00000000 02f326e0 fffff880
    fffff880`02f32520  00000002 00000000 065eb840 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32530  00ff64e4 fffff880 06705700 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32540  02f32611 fffff880 0000007f 00000000
    fffff880`02f32550  00000001 00000000 fd7c3acf fffff803
    fffff880`02f32560  00000000 00000000 080e2080 fffffa80
    fffff880`02f32570  02f32600 fffff880 00000000 00000000
    Right, so the code wanted to write to fffff880`02f32500 which as we can see above is a completely valid address. The 1st parameter and cr2 however note we failed writing to address fffffa806589b700. This does not make sense, and is essentially not logically possible.

    The hardware was told to write to fffff880`02f32500, and the hardware came back and said 'I cannot write to fffffa806589b700'. Another way to think about it is if you kindly asked the waiter of your table for more water, he writes it down, but comes back and says 'I'm sorry, but we're all out of coffee'.



    Also, this was a verifier enabled crash dump -- DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID: VERIFIER_ENABLED_VISTA_MINIDUMP

    Code:
    Verify Level 2092b ... enabled options are:
        Special pool
        Special irql
        All pool allocations checked on unload
        Deadlock detection enabled
        Security checks enabled
        Miscellaneous checks enabled
    
    Summary of All Verifier Statistics
    
    RaiseIrqls                             0x0
    AcquireSpinLocks                       0xfbf4b4
    Synch Executions                       0x124b88
    Trims                                  0xa77
    
    Pool Allocations Attempted             0x28395e
    Pool Allocations Succeeded             0x28395e
    Pool Allocations Succeeded SpecialPool 0x28395e
    Pool Allocations With NO TAG           0x26
    Pool Allocations Failed                0x0
    Resource Allocations Failed Deliberately   0x0
    
    Current paged pool allocations         0xa8 for 00100740 bytes
    Peak paged pool allocations            0xbc for 002387F0 bytes
    Current nonpaged pool allocations      0x6eb9 for 0099F300 bytes
    Peak nonpaged pool allocations         0x6f4f for 009B0B08 bytes
    With this said, I believe best course of action should be to run Memtest for NO LESS than ~8 passes (several hours):

    Memtest86+:

    Download Memtest86+ here:

    Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

    Which should I download?

    You can either download the pre-compiled ISO that you would burn to a CD and then boot from the CD, or you can download the auto-installer for the USB key. What this will do is format your USB drive, make it a bootable device, and then install the necessary files. Both do the same job, it's just up to you which you choose, or which you have available (whether it's CD or USB).

    Do note that some older generation motherboards do not support USB-based booting, therefore your only option is CD (or Floppy if you really wanted to).

    How Memtest works:

    Memtest86 writes a series of test patterns to most memory addresses, reads back the data written, and compares it for errors.

    The default pass does 9 different tests, varying in access patterns and test data. A tenth test, bit fade, is selectable from the menu. It writes all memory with zeroes, then sleeps for 90 minutes before checking to see if bits have changed (perhaps because of refresh problems). This is repeated with all ones for a total time of 3 hours per pass.

    Many chipsets can report RAM speeds and timings via SPD (Serial Presence Detect) or EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles), and some even support changing the expected memory speed. If the expected memory speed is overclocked, Memtest86 can test that memory performance is error-free with these faster settings.

    Some hardware is able to report the "PAT status" (PAT: enabled or PAT: disabled). This is a reference to Intel Performance acceleration technology; there may be BIOS settings which affect this aspect of memory timing.

    This information, if available to the program, can be displayed via a menu option.

    Any other questions, they can most likely be answered by reading this great guide here:

    FAQ : please read before posting

    especially with the IRQL Level being Passive, so we're not experiencing any interrupt level problems.

    Code:
    4: kd> !irql
    Debugger saved IRQL for processor 0x4 -- 0 (LOW_LEVEL)
    I've recently read on the ntdebugging blog that according to Windows Internals 4th edition, despite what !irql reports, in most cases it's not properly saved at the time of the crash, especially in minidumps.

    Windows Internals 4th Edition notes that IRQL may not be saved; this explains the 0
    Regards,

    Patrick

  13. #13

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Not necessary, regardless of where the error was in memory, it all has the same end result, which is faulty RAM. At this point, your next step is to go ahead and replace your RAM (all of it). I never recommend running 1 stick at a time because as I noted above, the end result is always the same, which is buying a new kit of RAM anyway. Never mix and match, always replace all the RAM when installing new RAM. The only time I recommend running 1 stick at a time is if the user cannot replace the RAM right away, and wishes to use whatever stick(s) may still be functional until they can replace the RAM.

    Regards,

    Patrick

  14. #14

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Not necessary, regardless of where the error was in memory, it all has the same end result, which is faulty RAM. At this point, your next step is to go ahead and replace your RAM (all of it). I never recommend running 1 stick at a time because as I noted above, the end result is always the same, which is buying a new kit of RAM anyway. Never mix and match, always replace all the RAM when installing new RAM. The only time I recommend running 1 stick at a time is if the user cannot replace the RAM right away, and wishes to use whatever stick(s) may still be functional until they can replace the RAM.

    Regards,

    Patrick
    I had suspicions that it could only be hardware...shame really it isn't even an old rig.

    Thank you so much for your time!

  15. #15

    Re: Multiple BSOD Crashes - Windows 8 x64

    My pleasure!

    Regards,

    Patrick

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