1. #1

    BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    I have had multiple issues over the last 2 monthes with windows BSOD crashes. I will attach zip for you to look. Thanks for all help.
    Attached Files Attached Files


    • Ad Bot

      advertising
      Beep.

        
       

  2. #2

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Sorry forgot to add system info. Win7 home premium retail build 7601 SP1
    AMD Phenom 2 1075
    ATI Radon 5770
    ASUS M4a88T-V EVO/USB3
    OCZ MOD X STREAM PRO 800watts

  3. #3
    Moderator, News & Information
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
    Contributor
    JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    7,194

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Hello patrickr,

    Stop 0x124 is a hardware error

    If you are overclocking try resetting your processor to standard settings and see if that helps.

    If you continue to get BSOD here are some more things you may want to consider.

    This is usually heat related, defective hardware, memory or even processor though it is"possible" that it is driver related (rare).



    Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try
    Synopsis:

    A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint.

    Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


    Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:

    1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.


    2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled.
    If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.


    3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware.
    It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.


    4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.


    5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug).
    At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated.

    6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially.
    The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s).
    For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing.
    For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors".
    Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.

    7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" re-installation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers - NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc.
    Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps.
    If you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes.
    Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
    If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the hardware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events.
    Be aware that attempting the subsequent hardware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:

    8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine.
    Reseat all connectors and memory modules.
    Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.

    9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed.
    Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.

    Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware.
    zigzag3143 says thanks for this.


    MVP 2013 - 2016

    Microsoft Community Contributor
    Windows Insider MVP July 2016 to end June 2017
    Dyami & Wankiya
    Team Zigzag



  4. #4
    zigzag3143's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,741
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        HP
      • Model Number:
        DV7
      • Cooling:
        Coolermaster U3 best in class
      • Operating System:
        Win 8 RTM

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickr View Post
    Sorry forgot to add system info. Win7 home premium retail build 7601 SP1
    AMD Phenom 2 1075
    ATI Radon 5770
    ASUS M4a88T-V EVO/USB3
    OCZ MOD X STREAM PRO 800watts




    You wouldnt by chance be overclocking would you? The below tend to indicate it and I would suggest reverting back to default AT least till the situation is resolved.

    I noticed linpack_xeon64.exe. The 64-bit program executable for a system with Intel(R) Xeon(R) processor using Intel(R) 64 architecture.

    And cpuocct64.exe related to OCCT (stands for "OverClock Checking Tool)

    Also 2+ year old BIOS. Might want to check with Asus for an update.


    Not related to crashes but worth noting


    AudioDG.exe --Often a cause of BSOD's (especially when "enhancements" are checked)

    McAfee is a frequent cause of BSOD's. I would remove and replace it with Microsoft Security Essentials AT LEAST TO TEST!

    http://download.mcafee.com/products/...tches/MCPR.exe

    http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/
    Last edited by zigzag3143; 07-08-2012 at 04:40 PM.
    JMH says thanks for this.

    MS-MVP Windows IT-PRO 2010-2017
    MCC-2013-2017
    Wankiya & Dyami
    Team ZigZag





  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    469

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Both JMH and Zigzag covered all the bases. There may be software at fault here. Make sure all software that came with your motherboard is uninstalled. Only install (and better yet, update) any drivers that came with your motherboard, as well as BIOS. This does not include USB drivers - remove them. Make sure also to get rid of any overclocking software. You should only overclock through the BIOS.

    Zigzag is right, not sure why that's there with the Xeon cpu thing. You are running a system with an AMD Phenom. Make sure only to run applications and install drivers related to AMD cpus and not to intel (only exception is if your motherboard uses an intel chipset).

    Btw, all of this is CPU-related. There seems to be a serious issue with any operations dealing with your L1 cache:

    Code:
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa800904a240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa800904a138
    Section       @ fffffa800904a2c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_DRD_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb647200060000135
      Address     : 0x000000011a6d5b00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    
    ...
    
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa800904b240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa800904b138
    Section       @ fffffa800904b2c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_DWR_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb60040009d000145
      Address     : 0x00000001302a4c00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    
    ...
    
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa8009074240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa8009074138
    Section       @ fffffa80090742c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_EVICT_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb64ec00000000175
      Address     : 0x0000000000000f00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    DCACHEL1_DRD_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Read - Error
    DCACHEL1_DWR_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Write - Error
    DCACHEL1_EVICT_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Evict - Error

    Notice they're all dealing with the same bank (bank 0). I personally believe we're dealing with a bad CPU here or some overheating/overclocking issues. However there are the strange cases where software from motherboards and the like can do this, so make sure that's not the case first. Otherwise, it's time to replace your CPU.

  6. #6

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vir Gnarus View Post
    Both JMH and Zigzag covered all the bases. There may be software at fault here. Make sure all software that came with your motherboard is uninstalled. Only install (and better yet, update) any drivers that came with your motherboard, as well as BIOS. This does not include USB drivers - remove them. Make sure also to get rid of any overclocking software. You should only overclock through the BIOS.

    Zigzag is right, not sure why that's there with the Xeon cpu thing. You are running a system with an AMD Phenom. Make sure only to run applications and install drivers related to AMD cpus and not to intel (only exception is if your motherboard uses an intel chipset).

    Btw, all of this is CPU-related. There seems to be a serious issue with any operations dealing with your L1 cache:

    Code:
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa800904a240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa800904a138
    Section       @ fffffa800904a2c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_DRD_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb647200060000135
      Address     : 0x000000011a6d5b00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    
    ...
    
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa800904b240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa800904b138
    Section       @ fffffa800904b2c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_DWR_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb60040009d000145
      Address     : 0x00000001302a4c00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    
    ...
    
    Proc. Info 0  @ fffffa8009074240
    
    ===============================================================================
    Section 2     : x86/x64 MCA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Descriptor    @ fffffa8009074138
    Section       @ fffffa80090742c0
    Offset        : 664
    Length        : 264
    Flags         : 0x00000000
    Severity      : Fatal
    
    Error         : DCACHEL1_EVICT_ERR (Proc 3 Bank 0)
      Status      : 0xb64ec00000000175
      Address     : 0x0000000000000f00
      Misc.       : 0x0000000000000000
    DCACHEL1_DRD_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Read - Error
    DCACHEL1_DWR_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Write - Error
    DCACHEL1_EVICT_ERR - Cache L1 - Data Evict - Error

    Notice they're all dealing with the same bank (bank 0). I personally believe we're dealing with a bad CPU here or some overheating/overclocking issues. However there are the strange cases where software from motherboards and the like can do this, so make sure that's not the case first. Otherwise, it's time to replace your CPU.

  7. #7

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    After review I removed the CMOS battery to undo the OC thru the Turbo 3 software. I will try to find the Xeon software not sure where it came from. I have check and unfortunately I have the latest update to my bios. Even though it I 2010. So i will check my events and go from there. Thanks again all.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    469

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Yeah, again, make sure you have no motherboard software installed, including sensor-reading software and OC software (Turbo 3). If you need to read temps n stuff, do so through a 3rd party app like Hwinfo or Hwmonitor. OC only through BIOS. I know I'm repeating myself on this, but I've often had to drill this in people's heads. Motherboard software is always buggy and gimmicky, and OCing should always be done through the BIOS, never through software. Both are very important to go on.

    Sorry to hear that your BIOS can't be updated further, though I personally don't believe it's involved with this predicament you're experiencing; yet it's always good to keep it - as well as other drivers - in check.

  9. #9

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vir Gnarus View Post
    Yeah, again, make sure you have no motherboard software installed, including sensor-reading software and OC software (Turbo 3). If you need to read temps n stuff, do so through a 3rd party app like Hwinfo or Hwmonitor. OC only through BIOS. I know I'm repeating myself on this, but I've often had to drill this in people's heads. Motherboard software is always buggy and gimmicky, and OCing should always be done through the BIOS, never through software. Both are very important to go on.

    Sorry to hear that your BIOS can't be updated further, though I personally don't believe it's involved with this predicament you're experiencing; yet it's always good to keep it - as well as other drivers - in check.

    Its seems you were right about the processor, look at this error i just got "A fatal hardware error has occurred.


    Reported by component: Processor Core

    Error Source: Machine Check Exception

    Error Type: Cache Hierarchy Error

    Processor ID: 3


    The details view of this entry contains further information."

    124 bug check 0x124_AuthenticAmd

  10. #10
    jcgriff2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    New Jersey Shore
    Posts
    16,326
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        HP
      • Model Number:
        HP ENVY TouchSmart 17-j130us Notebook - E8A04UA
      • Motherboard:
        HP Insyde 720265-501 6050A2549501-MB-A02
      • CPU:
        Intel Core i7-4700MQ Processor with Turbo Boost up to 3.4GHz.
      • Memory:
        12GB DDR3L SDRAM (2 DIMM)
      • Graphics:
        Intel HD graphics 4600 with up to 1792MB total graphics memory
      • Sound Card:
        Beats Audio quad speakers and two subwoofers
      • Hard Drives:
        1TB 5400RPM hard drive with HP ProtectSmart Hard Drive Protection
      • Disk Drives:
        Hitachi 500 GB SSD; 7 TB USB External
      • Power Supply:
        90w
      • Case:
        Laptop
      • Display:
        17.3-inch diagonal HD+ BrightView LED-backlit touchscreen display (1600 x 900)
      • Operating System:
        Windows 8.1

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    The prior BSODs were 0x124 fatal hardware error as well.

    BSOD Posting Instructions - Windows 10, 8.1, 8, 7 & Vista ` ` `Carrona Driver Reference Table (DRT)
    https://www.sysnative.com/
    Sysnative Hex-Decimal-UNIX Date Conversion

    Has Sysnative Forums helped you?
    Please consider donating to help support the forum.
    Thank You!

    Microsoft MVP 2009-2015
    Windows Insider MVP 2018 - Present

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    469

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Yeah, sounds bad. Get it replaced. Hopefully warranty on it hasn't expired yet.

  12. #12

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vir Gnarus View Post
    Yeah, sounds bad. Get it replaced. Hopefully warranty on it hasn't expired yet.

    what is a good way to test the cores? Yep got 3 yr warrany on all parts,.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,086
    Blog Entries
    7

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Lot's of CPU tests listed on this page: http://www.carrona.org/hwdiag.html#cpustress

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    469

    Re: BSOD Multiple Crashes.

    Here's an explanation for the Prime95 tests:

    Small FFTs - Tests primarily internal CPU caches and certain other internals like its FPP (floating point processor). Use if all you wanna test is CPU.

    Large FFTs - Less focus on CPU caches and more focus on RAM-to-CPU crosstalk. Primarily focuses on RAM use. It pressures RAM more than anything, and is somewhat an equivalent of Memtest86+ (just as sensitive, but not as thorough). I think this option gives most RAM-to-CPU crosstalk of all three.

    Blend - Uses a good bit of both internal CPU caches and RAM, therefore giving a lot of crosstalk between RAM and CPU and also ensuring both generic (RAM) and internal CPU caches are stressed. It's your best test to start off with, then if it faults, finish off with Small FFTs and Large FFTs to figure if it's crosstalk (RAM, motherboard) failure or just CPU failure.

    Given your scenario though, your CPU's internal L1 cache is definitely messed up, as any operations on it specifically are faulting. You're probably better off saving time and just replacing the CPU.

Similar Threads

  1. BSOD crashes on resume from sleep - Windows 7 x64
    By ickymay in forum BSOD, Crashes, Kernel Debugging
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-09-2014, 09:45 PM
  2. Multiple and varying BSOD's
    By SunnyDayCloud in forum BSOD, Crashes, Kernel Debugging
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-23-2013, 06:37 PM
  3. BSOD/Crashes/Windows 8
    By Shankz in forum BSOD, Crashes, Kernel Debugging
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-25-2012, 10:09 AM
  4. Multiple BSOD, Crashes, etc.
    By Plste3 in forum BSOD, Crashes, Kernel Debugging
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-25-2012, 07:35 AM
  5. [SOLVED] Constant BSOD crashes
    By cctexun in forum BSOD, Crashes, Kernel Debugging
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-31-2012, 03:27 PM

Log in

Log in