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  1. #1

    Windows 10 Freezing

    For a few months now, my system running Windows 10 has been experiencing occasional hard freezes. What happens precisely is that my computer will be running just fine, when suddenly the program I am using stops responding. Everything, from the start menu to the task manager, will be unresponsive when this occurs. Not long after, the mouse cursor will freeze too and the entire system will deadlock. At this point, the only solution seems to be to hard-reboot the system. I've tried just about everything under the sun to resolve this issue, from updating my drivers, to running intensive stress-testing software like Prime95 and Furmark, to testing each stick of RAM/memory slot individually using MemTest, to removing my AV software, to straight up reinstalling Windows - nothing can get the issue to reliably reproduce, yet nothing I've tried seems to fix it for good.

    Previously, this issue would only occur when playing certain VR games (Notably Rise of the Tomb Raider, which always caused a freeze within ten minutes), but since reinstalling Windows I've only seen it occur when using Discord on my web browser (Firefox). I should stress that these freezes are *very* intermittent - I'll see maybe one per week. The last three, however, have all occurred while typing out messages on Discord. Since nobody else seemed capable of helping me resolve this issue, I was about ready to give up trying to solve the problem, but then I noticed today that Windows *has* in fact been saving dump files around the time that the freezes occurred (Not the minidumps that it usually records on a proper BSOD). They've been located in the Windows\LiveKernelReports folder, and are a whopping 3GB in size each. Thing is, I don't know how to open these files properly (And I doubt I'd know what to look for even if I could), so I was hoping someone here might be able to help. I'm currently uploading the most recent dump file to Dropbox, hopefully someone here will know what to do with it.

    I did try opening the files using bluescreenview, but it wasn't particularly revealing: https://i.imgur.com/C3upEzt.png

    Thanks!

    Intel i7-6800K @3.4GHz
    MSI X99A SLI Plus
    Corsair 32GB DDR4 RAM @2666MHz
    Samsung 960 EVO
    Seagate 4TB HDD
    Corsair RM750X


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  2. #2

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Totally overlooked the stickied program, sorry about that.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #3

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    This is one of the dump files in question. I should probably also note that the system is about a year old now, and these problems started manifesting seemingly out of the blue a few months ago. Prior to that, the system ran just perfectly.

    According to Windbg, the other two errors were probably caused by win32kbase.sys, while this was caused by pdc.sys.

    Here is the complete dump file for the latest crash:

    Dropbox - PdcLockWatchdog-20180212-2353.zip

    And here is the detailed report the second most recent crash generated by WinDbg:

    Dropbox - log.txt

  4. #4
    HyperHenry's Avatar
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    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    It sounds like it is hardware related. Please download and run Speccy.


    • Please download Speccy System Information Tool and save it to somewhere convenient such as your desktop.
    • Close any programs that may be running including your browser and double click Speccy.exe to run the tool.
    • Watch out for any offers to install other programs such as google chrome and untick the box(es) if you don't want them.
    • Speccy will very quickly scan your pc and create a report.
    • Top left of screen click file and select Publish Snapshot...
    • Click Yes to proceed.
    • Copy the URL to your clipboard and paste it into your next reply.

  5. #5

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Everything pertaining to my system's installed hardware should already have been provided by the Sysinternal collection app, shouldn't it?

  6. #6
    Sysnative Staff
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
    Contributor

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
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    Age
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    Posts
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom build
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte B150-HD3P-CF
      • CPU:
        Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6500 CPU @ 3.20GHz
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4 Crucial Ballistix Sport LT BLS8G4D240F
      • Graphics:
        Intel(R) HD Graphics 530
      • Sound Card:
        (1) Intel(R) Display Audio (2) Realtek HD Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        Crucial MX200 500GB & 2x Toshiba DT01ACA300
      • Power Supply:
        Corsair RM550x
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define S
      • Cooling:
        Cooler Master TX3 i
      • Display:
        24" Liyama ProLite XB2483HSU-B2 & 24" Dell Ultrasharp U2414H
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Quote Originally Posted by Dalphelus View Post
    Everything pertaining to my system's installed hardware should already have been provided by the Sysinternal collection app, shouldn't it?
    Indeed, with a small exception for cooling, PSU and case

    A quick look at the raw stack of the thread holding the lock shows the NVME controller driver.
    Code:
    ********************************************************************************                                                                             *
    *                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
    *                                                                             *
    *******************************************************************************
    
    
    PDC_LOCK_WATCHDOG_LIVEDUMP (17c)
    A thread has been holding the PDC lock for too long
    (This code can never be used for a real bugcheck.)
    Arguments:
    Arg1: ffffd40426c58040, The thread holding the PDC lock.
    Arg2: 0000000000002710, pdc!PdcLockWatchdogTimeout [seconds].
    Arg3: 0000000000000000, Reserved.
    Arg4: 0000000000000000, Reserved.
    
    
    0: kd> !thread ffffd40426c58040
    THREAD ffffd40426c58040  Cid 0004.35d4  Teb: 0000000000000000 Win32Thread: 0000000000000000 WAIT: (WrResource) KernelMode Non-Alertable
        ffffe50e0166f340  SynchronizationEvent
    Not impersonating
    DeviceMap                 ffff9f8fe1e17c70
    Owning Process            ffffd4041c8dd440       Image:         System
    Attached Process          ffffd404236c9580       Image:         csrss.exe
    Wait Start TickCount      2909686        Ticks: 165 (0:00:00:02.578)
    Context Switch Count      11707          IdealProcessor: 0             
    UserTime                  00:00:00.000
    KernelTime                00:00:00.390
    Win32 Start Address nt!ExpWorkerThread (0xfffff800142ac050)
    Stack Init ffffe50e0166fc90 Current ffffe50e0166ee90
    Base ffffe50e01670000 Limit ffffe50e0166a000 Call 0000000000000000
    Priority 12 BasePriority 12 PriorityDecrement 0 IoPriority 2 PagePriority 5
    
    
    Child-SP          RetAddr           : Args to Child                                                           : Call Site
    ffffe50e`0166eed0 fffff800`1432def0 : 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`26c58100 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiSwapContext+0x76
    ffffe50e`0166f010 fffff800`1432d86e : ffffd404`26c58040 ffffd404`26c58140 ffffd404`26c58100 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiSwapThread+0x190
    ffffe50e`0166f0d0 fffff800`1432d049 : 00000000`0000003d 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 ffffe50e`0166f340 : nt!KiCommitThreadWait+0x10e
    ffffe50e`0166f170 fffff800`1432b08d : ffffe50e`0166f340 00000000`0000001b 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!KeWaitForSingleObject+0x1c9
    ffffe50e`0166f250 fffff800`142bf99f : ffffd404`23735b70 ffffe50e`0166f330 00000000`00010224 fffff800`143ad470 : nt!ExpWaitForResource+0x6d
    ffffe50e`0166f2d0 fffff800`142bf69f : 00000000`00000002 00000000`00000001 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`1cdec09c : nt!ExpAcquireResourceExclusiveLite+0x27f
    ffffe50e`0166f3a0 ffff8140`a40bf6a2 : ffffe50e`0166f7a0 00000000`00000001 ffffe50e`0166f428 ffffe50e`0166f638 : nt!ExEnterCriticalRegionAndAcquireResourceExclusive+0x3f
    ffffe50e`0166f3e0 ffff8140`a408b34d : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 fffff80d`00000000 ffffd404`1d21af78 : win32kbase!EnterCritAvoidingDitHitTestHazard+0x22
    ffffe50e`0166f420 ffff8140`a408c068 : 00000000`00000282 00000000`00000000 ffffe50e`0166f7c8 ffffd404`1cdec098 : win32kbase!UserSessionSwitchBlock_Start+0x49
    ffffe50e`0166f450 ffff8140`a40bf304 : 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`2164fe80 ffffe50e`0166f7c8 00000000`c000000d : win32kbase!UserPowerStateCallout+0x1cc
    ffffe50e`0166f4a0 ffff8140`a307103a : 00000000`00000000 fffff800`14611140 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : win32kbase!W32CalloutDispatch+0x594
    ffffe50e`0166f500 fffff800`1481dbf1 : 00000000`00000004 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`236c9580 00000000`c000000d : win32k!W32CalloutDispatchThunk+0xa
    ffffe50e`0166f530 fffff800`1472d41b : 00000000`00000010 00000000`00000082 ffffe50e`0166f618 ffffd404`1da4f280 : nt!ExCallSessionCallBack+0x91
    ffffe50e`0166f5f0 fffff800`147b02ca : ffffd404`20ad3580 ffffe50e`0166f699 ffff9b45`c8d7d9ee 00000000`00000001 : nt!PsInvokeWin32Callout+0xcb
    ffffe50e`0166f620 fffff800`14982e01 : fffff80d`00000004 ffffe50e`0166f7c8 ffffe50e`0166f7c8 ffffe50e`0166f919 : nt!PopInvokeWin32Callout+0x11e
    ffffe50e`0166f700 fffff800`14982ab5 : fffff80d`a7c6bc2c fffff80d`a7c61130 ffffe50e`0166f7c8 00000000`00000001 : nt!PopDispatchStateCallout+0xa1
    ffffe50e`0166f770 fffff800`149857c5 : 00000000`00000001 ffffffff`fffe7960 ffffe50e`0166f810 fffff800`14327401 : nt!PoBlockConsoleSwitch+0x31
    ffffe50e`0166f7a0 fffff80d`a7c77a57 : ffffd404`26c58040 fffff80d`a7c67860 ffffc385`1c3cdd7c 00000000`00000092 : nt!PopBlockSessionSwitch+0x45
    ffffe50e`0166f800 fffff80d`a7c628e3 : ffffd404`ffffffff ffffd404`1da542d0 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`26c583b0 : pdc!PdcMonitorControl+0x27
    ffffe50e`0166f830 fffff80d`a7c7aaca : 00000000`00000001 ffffd404`00000000 00000000`00000000 ffffd404`1da542d0 : pdc!PdcpTriggerActionByCaps+0x1a3
    ffffe50e`0166f970 fffff80d`a7c7a5cf : 00000000`00000001 ffffd404`1da542d0 ffffd404`1da3e540 ffffd404`1f8ad870 : pdc!PdcpHandleSwitch+0x346
    ffffe50e`0166fae0 fffff80d`a7c7af6b : 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000001 fffff800`146a3200 : pdc!PdcSystemButtonHandler+0xcf
    ffffe50e`0166fb20 fffff80d`a7c62cd0 : 00000000`00000800 fffff800`145e67c0 ffffd404`1c8bec80 fffff800`1436de10 : pdc!PdcpPolicyWorkerMain+0x2b
    ffffe50e`0166fb50 fffff800`142ac145 : ffffd404`26c58040 ffffd404`1c8bec80 fffff800`1460ef00 fffff80d`a8054150 : pdc!PdcpPolicyWorkerThread+0x70
    ffffe50e`0166fb80 fffff800`143a26e7 : ffffd404`26c58040 00000000`00000080 ffffd404`1c8dd440 ffffd404`26c58040 : nt!ExpWorkerThread+0xf5
    ffffe50e`0166fc10 fffff800`14408036 : fffff800`13084180 ffffd404`26c58040 fffff800`143a26a0 33333333`33333333 : nt!PspSystemThreadStartup+0x47
    ffffe50e`0166fc60 00000000`00000000 : ffffe50e`01670000 ffffe50e`0166a000 00000000`00000000 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiStartSystemThread+0x16
    
    0: kd> dps ffffe50e0166a000 ffffe50e01670000
    ...
    ffffe50e`0166d880  ffffd404`2002a430
    ffffe50e`0166d888  ffffe50e`0166da28
    ffffe50e`0166d890  00000000`00000286
    ffffe50e`0166d898  fffff80d`a7ed354c*** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for secnvme.sys
     secnvme+0x354c
    ffffe50e`0166d8a0  00000000`00000000
    ffffe50e`0166d8a8  ffffe50e`0166d938
    ffffe50e`0166d8b0  00000000`00000005
    ...
    
    0: kd> lmvm secnvme
    Browse full module list
    start             end                 module name
    fffff80d`a7ed0000 fffff80d`a7ef2000   secnvme    (no symbols)           
        Loaded symbol image file: secnvme.sys
        Image path: \SystemRoot\System32\drivers\secnvme.sys
        Image name: secnvme.sys
        Browse all global symbols  functions  data
        Timestamp:        Thu Oct 12 11:28:59 2017 (59DF35DB)
        CheckSum:         0002935A
        ImageSize:        00022000
        Translations:     0000.04b0 0000.04e4 0409.04b0 0409.04e4

    But, I am more curious about this.
    Code:
    [Memory Device (Type 17) - Length 40 - Handle 005ah]
      Physical Memory Array Handle  0058h
      Memory Error Info Handle      [Not Provided]
      Total Width                   72 bits
      Data Width                    72 bits
      Size                          8192MB
      Form Factor                   09h - DIMM
      Device Set                    [None]
      Device Locator                DIMM_A1
      Bank Locator                  NODE 1
      Memory Type                   1ah - Specification Reserved
      Type Detail                   0080h - Synchronous
      Speed                         2800MHz
      Manufacturer                  Undefined
      Serial Number                         
      Asset Tag Number                              
      Part Number                   CMK32GX4M4A2666C16
    According to the specs of the model, the tested speed is 2666MHz so I am wondering if you're aware of this speed.

  7. #7

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    That is unusual. It should be at 2666MHz. Though honestly, even the BIOS doesn't seem to report the frequency correctly - It claims its running at 2133Mhz when XMP is enabled. CPU-Z reports the correct frequency though:
    https://i.imgur.com/Wx0BF1O.png

    It used to report correctly, but since installing my Samsung 960 SSD and enabling the WINDOWS 8/10 WHQL SUPPORT setting (As I was evidently supposed to when installing an M.2 drive) it hasn't always. Could this possibly be behind this? Should I upload the other DMP files as well for comparison?

    Also, my cooling system is the Corsair H100i v2, my PSU is the Corsair RM750X, and my case is a CoolerMaster Trooper.

  8. #8
    Sysnative Staff
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
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    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Age
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    Posts
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom build
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte B150-HD3P-CF
      • CPU:
        Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6500 CPU @ 3.20GHz
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4 Crucial Ballistix Sport LT BLS8G4D240F
      • Graphics:
        Intel(R) HD Graphics 530
      • Sound Card:
        (1) Intel(R) Display Audio (2) Realtek HD Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        Crucial MX200 500GB & 2x Toshiba DT01ACA300
      • Power Supply:
        Corsair RM550x
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define S
      • Cooling:
        Cooler Master TX3 i
      • Display:
        24" Liyama ProLite XB2483HSU-B2 & 24" Dell Ultrasharp U2414H
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Could you revert it back to the SPD speed

  9. #9
    HyperHenry's Avatar
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    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Speccy gives us a quick easy to read look at hardware and possible issues.

  10. #10

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    To be sure, I've cleared my CMOS and only enabled WHQL/XMP Profile 1. I don't manually overclock my hardware, so it should be running at SPD.

    However, I believe that it may be a limitation in the data collection software that's getting it to report a frequency of 2800MHz. Opening up Task Manager, it too reports 2800MHz. Apparently, this is simply an error as Task Manager is not designed to actually read the BIOS settings, it just reports what the manufacturer claims it can run at. (So was said here, anyways: Wrong RAM speed in Windows Task Manager - Windows 10 Forums). According to my SPD Timings Table, the default XMP Profile 2 will actually set the frequency to 2800MHz at 1.35V, which is probably why Task Manager thinks it's running at that frequency - it's just reporting what Corsair claimed it can safely run at. Since the same information is probably what's being written to the DMP file, that would explain the discrepancy.

    CPU-Z vs Task Manager:
    https://i.imgur.com/fRPvIWB.png

    Here are my SPD timings:
    https://i.imgur.com/Z1qY2Kc.png

  11. #11
    Sysnative Staff
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
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    Join Date
    May 2015
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    The Netherlands
    Age
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    Posts
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom build
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte B150-HD3P-CF
      • CPU:
        Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6500 CPU @ 3.20GHz
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4 Crucial Ballistix Sport LT BLS8G4D240F
      • Graphics:
        Intel(R) HD Graphics 530
      • Sound Card:
        (1) Intel(R) Display Audio (2) Realtek HD Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        Crucial MX200 500GB & 2x Toshiba DT01ACA300
      • Power Supply:
        Corsair RM550x
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define S
      • Cooling:
        Cooler Master TX3 i
      • Display:
        24" Liyama ProLite XB2483HSU-B2 & 24" Dell Ultrasharp U2414H
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    The RAM data is from the PdcLockWatchdog dump you uploaded, the file with the RAM data from the tool is empty.

    I don't want to argue with you, but if this would be true then I wonder why task manager shows 2133MHz for my RAM instead of 2400MHz for which it was designed to run at.
    Apparently, this is simply an error as Task Manager is not designed to actually read the BIOS settings, it just reports what the manufacturer claims it can run at.
    CPU-z shows for me 2400/1200 with XMP2.0 which is not entirely true, the motherboard I use lists my RAM at 2400 with a downgrade to 2133MHz.

  12. #12

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    I certainly could be mistaken, I'm just going off the information I'm finding on other threads. From what I can gather, there are many accounts where Windows' Task Manager tends to get that particular bit of information wrong, reporting frequencies that are either too high or too low. It might logically follow that Windows' Watchdog dumps would also make the same mistake since it probably gets that information the same way as the Task Manager.

    In either case, my BIOS is now correctly reporting the current frequency as being at 2666MHz, (which seems to be backed up CPU-Z), and I'm more inclined to trust what the mainboard is reporting rather than the OS.

  13. #13
    Sysnative Staff
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
    Contributor

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Age
    21
    Posts
    513
    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom build
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte B150-HD3P-CF
      • CPU:
        Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6500 CPU @ 3.20GHz
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4 Crucial Ballistix Sport LT BLS8G4D240F
      • Graphics:
        Intel(R) HD Graphics 530
      • Sound Card:
        (1) Intel(R) Display Audio (2) Realtek HD Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        Crucial MX200 500GB & 2x Toshiba DT01ACA300
      • Power Supply:
        Corsair RM550x
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define S
      • Cooling:
        Cooler Master TX3 i
      • Display:
        24" Liyama ProLite XB2483HSU-B2 & 24" Dell Ultrasharp U2414H
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    If possible, please configure the BIOS to use the SPD speed.

  14. #14

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Do you mean turn off XMP altogether?

  15. #15
    Sysnative Staff
    BSOD Kernel Dump Analyst
    Contributor

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Age
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    Posts
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    • specs System Specs
      • Manufacturer:
        Custom build
      • Motherboard:
        Gigabyte B150-HD3P-CF
      • CPU:
        Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6500 CPU @ 3.20GHz
      • Memory:
        16GB DDR4 Crucial Ballistix Sport LT BLS8G4D240F
      • Graphics:
        Intel(R) HD Graphics 530
      • Sound Card:
        (1) Intel(R) Display Audio (2) Realtek HD Audio
      • Hard Drives:
        Crucial MX200 500GB & 2x Toshiba DT01ACA300
      • Power Supply:
        Corsair RM550x
      • Case:
        Fractal Design Define S
      • Cooling:
        Cooler Master TX3 i
      • Display:
        24" Liyama ProLite XB2483HSU-B2 & 24" Dell Ultrasharp U2414H
      • Operating System:
        Windows 10 Pro

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    Yes.

  16. #16

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    I've now done so. Had another freeze this morning and upon rebooting though, and I got an error stating that "The previous overclock settings have failed, system has been restored to its default settings". I've seen this a few times now when booting, though usually only after changing anything hardware-related. No crash dumps were saved this time that I can see. Even with XMP off, Windows still thinks I'm running at 2800MHz. https://i.imgur.com/SvZfBhf.png

    I'm really at a loss on this one. Does nothing in those logs indicate what the problem may be? Is there something confusing about what they're reporting? At this point I just wonder if the motherboard is simply failing. Or maybe the power supply?

  17. #17
    HyperHenry's Avatar
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    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    If you would upload a Speccy report I can take a look. It shows things the Sysnative doesn't show.


    • Please download Speccy System Information Tool and save it to somewhere convenient such as your desktop.
    • Close any programs that may be running including your browser and double click Speccy.exe to run the tool.
    • Watch out for any offers to install other programs such as google chrome and untick the box(es) if you don't want them.
    • Speccy will very quickly scan your pc and create a report.
    • Top left of screen click file and select Publish Snapshot...
    • Click Yes to proceed.
    • Copy the URL to your clipboard and paste it into your next reply.

  18. #18

  19. #19
    HyperHenry's Avatar
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    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    I found this in the SMART Values on your HDD. The normal G-Sense Rate is 58. This indicates that the head mechanism may be failing.

    Attribute name:
    G-sense error rate

    Real value: 2,435

    Current: 99

    Worst: 99


    Threshold: 0


    Raw Value: 0000000983

  20. #20

    Re: Windows 10 Freezing

    I can't find any information pertaining to the current or worst where the G-Sense is related - do you have a source on the "normal" G-Sense Rating? It is really unusual that the real value is so high, though. It seems to increment by 1 every half hour even when the HDD (And the rest of the computer) is idle. Dunno what could be causing that, given it's supposed to detect external movement. The computer's resting on a hardwood floor and I'm not banging it around or anything. I did note a few months back that it does seem to perform slightly worse than expected, only delivering around R160MB/s W130MB/s on sequential benchmarks. Otherwise however, it hasn't given me any trouble...

    I've also unplugged an HDMI>DP cable that I've previously been using to connect my monitor to my GPU for the sake of the Vive - apparently it's not unheard of for a dodgy cable to cause BSODs and the like under certain circumstances, and that's the only other thing that has "changed" since these freezes began occurring. Will see if that helps, I suppose.

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