1. #1

    bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Hi Satrow,

    I've attached a perfmon.zip and a belarc.zip profile.

    Can't remember when I bought it but would be at least 5+ years and

    Windows re-installed: 6/06/2012 9:13:42 AM originally OEM.

    Please let me know if you need anything else.

    Cheers,
    Bob.Belarc Advisor Computer Profile.zipBob Slatyer- Perfmon.zip


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  2. #2
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Are you having BSODs or what?
    Can you follow these instructions anyway.

    http://www.sysnative.com/forums/bsod...ows-vista.html

  3. #3

    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Jared View Post
    Are you having BSODs or what?
    Can you follow these instructions anyway.

    http://www.sysnative.com/forums/bsod...ows-vista.html
    No there is no Blue Screen when the computer stops.

    It's a plain black screen and will restart if I move the mouse.

    It's almost as if it goes to sleep, except that it restarts from the starting windows screen.

    Memory test. When I do this one the screen flashes on and off. Not long enough for me to read it.

    The Driver Test. This one runs for a while then the computer stops as described above. I don't see how I could run it for 24 hrs.

    I'll try the Driver Test again today.AutoRuns.zipAttachment 9258Bob Slatyer- Perfmon.zipBelarc Advisor Computer Profile.zipAutoRuns.zip

    I've just realized that it only crashes when I leave it unattended and don't put it to sleep.

    Cheers
    Bob.

  4. #4
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    What do you mean by driver test?

    What anti virus have you got?

  5. #5
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Hi Bob, Jared.

    This is continued from Kernel-Power crash problem | Windows Secrets Lounge post #8, I've only just noticed this topic.

    0x3B bugcheck/reboot logged, Windows 7 Home on an Acer Aspire 5740G notebook, location Jakarta so heat might be an issue, I'll catchup with the latest logs now.

  6. #6
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Thanks a lot satrow.
    Feel free to post.

  7. #7
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Thanks, Jared, step in anytime, especially if we get a dump to work with

    I couldn't find anything definitive about the bugcheck cause but it looks like Defrag was active at the time; this might point towards a fault in the drive, drive firmware, motherboard/BIOS, possibly a (corrupt?) Windows power setting - it might be down to excess heat build up during defrag activity!

    The System log timeline seemed to be:
    15:45, an MSE quick scan completed, after which a number of Services stopped (15:58 - 16:07)
    16:16, The Disk Defragmenter service entered the running state. < loose end, no log of it stopping!
    16:17, the Windows Time Service started then stopped normally
    16:31, The operating system started at system time ?2014?-?09?-?14T09:31:29.125599400Z. < Restart after bugheck!
    The Applications log showed nothing between 15:45 and the chkdsk at boot up.

    Bugcheck and ThermalZone data (could someone check what the temps mean, as in are they the actual temps or effective limits, please?):
    Read More:




    Bob, hardware problems and faults will trump anything we can do with software.

    It's vital to ensure that the notebook is cooled efficiently, check that the intakes and exhaust ports are clean and that the fan, when it's running, is pushing the air through efficiently. Try to elevate the rear of the notebook without blocking the intakes, a couple of pencils or a chopstick might be enough. Don't use the notebook directly on a soft surface, set it on something like a tray.

    You seem to have both MSE and Qihoo 360 installed, uninstall 360 and check that MSE is running and that the built-in Windows firewall is running. Having more than one AV active can cause issues as they can work against each other, causing higher CPU% (heat!), excessive error logging/drive wear/network traffic, one AV flagging updates to the other AV as false positives, etc.

    Your drive is already damaged/contains bad blocks, ensure you have backed up any vital files away from the PC and check the SMART and hard drive health (I use Hard Disk Sentinel: Hard Disk Sentinel - HDD health and temperature monitoring).

    Run chkdsk C: /r /f and allow it to reboot to run the checks.

    Run SFC /scannow to repair any damaged/missing System files, if it reports that it cannot fix some files, reboot and run it again (and reboot/run it 2 more times if it still reports errors that can't be fixed).

    Other snippets from the logs below.
    Read More:

  8. #8

    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Hey Jared, Thanks heaps for all your info. Looks like I've got a bit work ahead of me.

    Event [277] is a program Colasoft Capsa. I recently downloaded it to check the people, to whom my computer is uploading info. I haven't had time to use it yet. Would that driver run before the program is started?

    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    Thanks, Jared, step in anytime, especially if we get a dump to work with

    I couldn't find anything definitive about the bugcheck cause but it looks like Defrag was active at the time; this might point towards a fault in the drive, drive firmware, motherboard/BIOS, possibly a (corrupt?) Windows power setting - it might be down to excess heat build up during defrag activity!

    The System log timeline seemed to be:
    15:45, an MSE quick scan completed, after which a number of Services stopped (15:58 - 16:07)
    16:16, The Disk Defragmenter service entered the running state. < loose end, no log of it stopping!
    16:17, the Windows Time Service started then stopped normally
    16:31, The operating system started at system time ?2014?-?09?-?14T09:31:29.125599400Z. < Restart after bugheck!
    The Applications log showed nothing between 15:45 and the chkdsk at boot up.

    Bugcheck and ThermalZone data (could someone check what the temps mean, as in are they the actual temps or effective limits, please?):
    Read More:




    Bob, hardware problems and faults will trump anything we can do with software.

    It's vital to ensure that the notebook is cooled efficiently, check that the intakes and exhaust ports are clean and that the fan, when it's running, is pushing the air through efficiently. Try to elevate the rear of the notebook without blocking the intakes, a couple of pencils or a chopstick might be enough. Don't use the notebook directly on a soft surface, set it on something like a tray.

    You seem to have both MSE and Qihoo 360 installed, uninstall 360 and check that MSE is running and that the built-in Windows firewall is running. Having more than one AV active can cause issues as they can work against each other, causing higher CPU% (heat!), excessive error logging/drive wear/network traffic, one AV flagging updates to the other AV as false positives, etc.

    Your drive is already damaged/contains bad blocks, ensure you have backed up any vital files away from the PC and check the SMART and hard drive health (I use Hard Disk Sentinel: Hard Disk Sentinel - HDD health and temperature monitoring).

    Run chkdsk C: /r /f and allow it to reboot to run the checks.

    Run SFC /scannow to repair any damaged/missing System files, if it reports that it cannot fix some files, reboot and run it again (and reboot/run it 2 more times if it still reports errors that can't be fixed).

    Other snippets from the logs below.
    Read More:

  9. #9

    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Hi,

    It looks like you may be overheating, and active and passive cooling are being taken as actions.

    In the first event:

    Code:
    ACPI thermal zone ACPI\ThermalZone\TZS0 has been enumerated.             
     _PSV = 371K             
    _TC1 = 0             
    _TC2 = 50             
    _TSP = 0ms             
    _AC0 = 0K             
    _AC1 = 0K             
    _AC2 = 0K             
    _AC3 = 0K             
    _AC4 = 0K             
    _AC5 = 0K             
    _AC6 = 0K             
    _AC7 = 0K             
    _AC8 = 0K             
    _AC9 = 0K             
     _CRT = 373K             
    _HOT = 0K             
    _PSL - see event data.
    Above are known as thermal zones, which are essentially different physical regions of the hardware platform that are partitioned. This is done so that when a sensor detects that a thermal zone is overheating, it will either use passive or active cooling to cool the devices in the specific zone as I mentioned above.

    _PSV indicates the temperature at which the operating system started passive cooling control. In your case, this was 371K (K = Kelvin). 371 Kelvin is 97.85 Celsius, which is beyond the threshold of what any piece of hardware (CPU, GPU, etc) can handle.

    This is why we lead to _CRT which indicates the temperature at which the operating system will shut down as it simply cannot throttle (passive) or use fans (active) to succeed in cooling these temperatures in time before permanent damage. In this case, you were at 373 Kelvin when this occurred, which was 99.85 Celsius.

    Your next step should be to do a full system clean and get rid of any dust, etc. Remove all hardware such as the GPU, CPU (clean heatsink, re-apply thermal paste), etc. Give them a good clean, as well as the fans throughout the system.

    Regards,

    Patrick

  10. #10
    satrow's Avatar
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    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    I'm not familiar with the Capsa software but I'd guess that the protocol driver needs to be loaded before the software can access the networking data - it might not be needed, it looks like there's a 64-bit version of it running (csn5pdts82x64), perhaps they need to update their installer?

    Whilst checking that, I did spot a couple more items that need attention: CCleaner's running, set it not to start at boot time and uncheck the section that cleans out Windows crash dumps, we need those, also CoreTemp is running, the driver for that has been known/suspected to trigger BSODs iirc, uninstall it. I use HWiNFO64 set for Sensors only when I need monitoring software.



    Thanks for the breakdown of the ThermalZone data, Patrick

  11. #11

    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    I'm not familiar with the Capsa software but I'd guess that the protocol driver needs to be loaded before the software can access the networking data - it might not be needed, it looks like there's a 64-bit version of it running (csn5pdts82x64), perhaps they need to update their installer?

    Whilst checking that, I did spot a couple more items that need attention: CCleaner's running, set it not to start at boot time and uncheck the section that cleans out Windows crash dumps, we need those, also CoreTemp is running, the driver for that has been known/suspected to trigger BSODs iirc, uninstall it. I use HWiNFO64 set for Sensors only when I need monitoring software.



    Thanks for the breakdown of the ThermalZone data, Patrick
    Thanks for the prompt reply and info CCleaner and CorTemp Will fix. I will attach 3 dump files from Sept 15 but I'm pretty sure there was no crash yesterday. Just realized I'm on a different computer whilst the other one is dskchking I put them up earlier on Windows Secret Forum in a reply to Satrow.

  12. #12

    re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Jared View Post
    What do you mean by driver test?

    What anti virus have you got?
    Sorry it was either the Driver or Memory Test.

    I have Windows Security and Malwarebytes.

  13. #13
    satrow's Avatar
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    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    No real need for dumps yet, Bob, priority is to get the notebook cooling system cleaned out, the cooling fan(s) checked and replace the TIM (thermal interface material) on the CPU (and GPU).

    There should be plenty of tear down guides, including videos on Youtube etc. but ensure you use the full Aspire model# in your search string (5470G-xxxx ?) so that you're working with the correct internal layout.

    If you're using a desktop fan for additional cooling in the meantime, eg. to get your data backed up, don't set the fan to blow towards the notebook exhaust vents, work with the cooling flow!

  14. #14

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by satrow View Post
    No real need for dumps yet, Bob, priority is to get the notebook cooling system cleaned out, the cooling fan(s) checked and replace the TIM (thermal interface material) on the CPU (and GPU).

    There should be plenty of tear down guides, including videos on Youtube etc. but ensure you use the full Aspire model# in your search string (5470G-xxxx ?) so that you're working with the correct internal layout.
    If you're using a desktop fan for additional cooling in the meantime, eg. to get your data backed up, don't set the fan to blow towards the notebook exhaust vents, work with the cooling flow!
    Thanks Satrow. I will do everything possible before taking it apart. First up I've put my big battery in, that lifts the back of the laptop about an inch off the ground. I checked all the intakes and outlets and they looked okay but it's difficult to see the CPU fan. I checked Temperature yesterday, with out the big fan, not under a big load but it looked good about 63C on idle and 72C under a small load. That's a lot better than high 80s. I'll need to buy a trestle table before I can strip it down coz not enough space at the moment. After all the tests looks like an overheat problem.
    Cheers,
    Bob.
    Last edited by bslattts; 09-16-2014 at 08:20 PM. Reason: Reply in Quote box

  15. #15

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    63C on idle
    Still a little too high, even for a laptop.

    Regarding the thermal paste comment I made earlier, it's really only ever necessary to change thermal paste if it has been several years since it has last been changed, and is drying out (warranting a reapplication). If it has only been a few years, and you think it's more just a strip-down and cleaning of all components, hardware, fans, etc, then that's just fine.

    Regards,

    Patrick

  16. #16

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    63C on idle
    Still a little too high, even for a laptop.

    Regarding the thermal paste comment I made earlier, it's really only ever necessary to change thermal paste if it has been several years since it has last been changed, and is drying out (warranting a reapplication). If it has only been a few years, and you think it's more just a strip-down and cleaning of all components, hardware, fans, etc, then that's just fine.

    Regards,

    Patrick
    Thanks Patrick for the qualification. It's 5+ years, I think, can't remember.

  17. #17

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    We'll wait and see if the temperatures are in a desirable range after the clean. If not, we'll move onto the thermal paste reapplication.

    Regards,

    Patrick

  18. #18

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Hi,

    It looks like you may be overheating, and active and passive cooling are being taken as actions.

    In the first event:

    Code:
    ACPI thermal zone ACPI\ThermalZone\TZS0 has been enumerated.             
     _PSV = 371K             
    _TC1 = 0             
    _TC2 = 50             
    _TSP = 0ms             
    _AC0 = 0K             
    _AC1 = 0K             
    _AC2 = 0K             
    _AC3 = 0K             
    _AC4 = 0K             
    _AC5 = 0K             
    _AC6 = 0K             
    _AC7 = 0K             
    _AC8 = 0K             
    _AC9 = 0K             
     _CRT = 373K             
    _HOT = 0K             
    _PSL - see event data.
    Above are known as thermal zones, which are essentially different physical regions of the hardware platform that are partitioned. This is done so that when a sensor detects that a thermal zone is overheating, it will either use passive or active cooling to cool the devices in the specific zone as I mentioned above.

    _PSV indicates the temperature at which the operating system started passive cooling control. In your case, this was 371K (K = Kelvin). 371 Kelvin is 97.85 Celsius, which is beyond the threshold of what any piece of hardware (CPU, GPU, etc) can handle.

    This is why we lead to _CRT which indicates the temperature at which the operating system will shut down as it simply cannot throttle (passive) or use fans (active) to succeed in cooling these temperatures in time before permanent damage. In this case, you were at 373 Kelvin when this occurred, which was 99.85 Celsius.

    Your next step should be to do a full system clean and get rid of any dust, etc. Remove all hardware such as the GPU, CPU (clean heatsink, re-apply thermal paste), etc. Give them a good clean, as well as the fans throughout the system.

    Regards,

    Patrick
    Thanks Patrick. Sorry this post must have somehow slipped through the cracks but I get it. When I Defragged I noticed that it was scheduled to run at 1:30 am and my laptop is never on at that time. I wonder if defrag activates when the computer is on but not busy.
    Cheers,
    Bob.

  19. #19

    Re: bslattts Kernel-Power Crash - Windows 7 x64

    Windows automatically defrags I believe it's weekly, late at night. As you said, it does this during a time that you'd likely not be doing any intensive tasks that require you to have full resources of your computer dedicated to whatever it is you are doing. This way, when it's defragging, it can devote its resources to defragging to get the job done, and then finish.

    You can change all default defrag settings by going to Start > Search > Defrag, and then change from there.

    Regards,

    Patrick

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